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  1. 2019 Quarterback Class

    Don't Count the "Little Man" Out - Penn State's Trace McSorley Athletic Ability McSorley has the functional arm strength that allows him to make all of his throws. Some might question his deep ball ability, but he completed nearly 17% of his passes for twenty yards or longer in 2017 (see Akron, Georgia State, Indiana, Michigan State games). He shows good feet and enough balance and quickness to slide and avoid the pass rush, but will not win many foot races in the open field, rather masterfully setting up the defender to bite early with his hip shake and head fakes. He is quick dropping back from the line of scrimmage to his set point. He displays good coordination on the move and the body control to move around the pocket with ease. When he throws flat-footed and fails to set his feet, he loses zip and velocity on his long throws, though. He is fearless under pressure, knowing just the right time to tuck-&-run with the ball (see 2017 Akron, Pittsburgh,, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, Washington games). Even though he generally plays in the shotgun, you can see that he has the ability to get back and set up quickly. He compensates for a lack of great height with quick decision-passing, even though there are times where he struggles to get the ball over defensive linemen in tight areas (see 2017 Iowa, Michigan State, Washington games). Much like the Seahawks' Russell Wilson, his savvy and ability to side-step the pass rush allows him to stay alive in the pocket. He may be the most opportunistic running quarterback in this draft class, even though Mississippi State's Nick Fitzgerald has two 1,000-yard seasons. Football Sense McSorley is a cerebral quarterback who is rarely fooled by coverage. He makes strong pre-snap reads and demonstrated improvement as a junior in manipulating the defense with his eyes and legs (see 2017 Akron, Michigan, Nebraska games). He shows good poise in a muddy backfield, stepping up to avoid the rush and challenging linebackers to either commit to stopping him from scrambling or dropping off to cover receivers behind them. He is more than willing to scramble, but he also does a nice job of keeping his eyes downfield until the last possible second. He is quick to retain plays, having no problem taking them from the board to the field. He has good field vision and makes quick decisions and adjustments before the snap, doing an excellent job of calling audibles. He stands tall under pressure to buy time for his receivers to get open. He is quick to pick up the hot reads, checks and route progressions. He spends the extra hours studying game films and can pick up schemes easily. His intelligence test score indicates he is capable of handling the mental aspect of the game. He is at the “top of his game” when not pressured and this “sharp kid” has a nice touch on the ball. You saw in 2017 that he made marked improvement making calls at the line of scrimmage (see Akron, Georgia State, Rutgers games). Set Up McSorley is very efficient with his set-up and delivery of the ball. He has experience taking snaps from under center and shotgun. While he is not under center often, he does drop back quickly and shows good rhythm and timing, planting his back foot and driving the quick slant. Has a quick, over the top release and does an excellent job of finding clear passing lanes from which to throw. Even though his rushing numbers give you this indication, McSorley is not the type who will bolt at the first sign of pressure. He has nimble feet, showing functional foot speed to set up and retreat from the line of scrimmage to get to his throwing point. He has the body control to slide in the pocket and when he keeps his feet under him, displays the ability to throw on the move (will get flat-footed at times and this affects his velocity and accuracy). He gets good depth in his pass drop (3-5 step) and shows good upper and lower body mechanics. He is well-versed in a pro-style attack and carries the ball well. He has worked on developing a more compact motion, as he did wind up quite a bit during his sophomore season (resulted in high amounts of pass deflections, as defenders had good success setting up when he double-clutched). Reading Defenses McSorley makes lots of line calls operating out of the shotgun, but you would figure with his rushing ability that he would run with the ball more when pressured rather than try to force the ball into a crowd. In the NFL, he has one trait coaches love - the ability to make good progression reads. He will be patient waiting for things to develop, but he also has confidence in his ability to run with the ball when his primary and secondary targets are unavailable. He sees the field better operating out of the shotgun and while some scouts think he might have problems doing so under center, due to a lack of height, one only has to look at his completion numbers and ability to convert third-down plays (see 2017 Iowa, Northwestern, Michigan State, Washington games). Still, he is good at anticipating opportunities, leading to 282 touchdown passes and eleven scoring runs in 2017. He is very good at anticipating defensive schemes and will generally show good judgment, stepping up and out of pressure to buy time so his target can get open and despite just an average frame, he will stand tall and absorb punishment rather than force the ball into a crowd. With his nimble feet, he is considered a player who can be creative running with the ball. I like his toughness, as he is willing to take a sack rather than throw the ball up for grabs. He has developed enough that he no longer spends a lot of time hanging on to his primary targets, as he developed great confidence in his tight ends to utilize them as safety valves during the course of the 2017 season. He might miss a read every now and then, but has a short memory and will not let one play affect the way he performs the rest of the game. He is very quick and decisive picking up coverages and has good ability to read on the pre-snap. Despite a young and questionable protection from his offensive line, he will not force things just to make things happen. He takes what the defense gives him and is good at improvising. You can see on film that he has good timing and touch to move the chains rather than go for the “home run” ball, a perfect fit for a West Coast-type of offense. Release McSorley demonstrates the compact delivery and throwing motion, along with the wrist flick, to get the ball out cleanly and quickly. He has a compact motion, holding the ball chest-high to execute a fluid ¾ release. He gets the ball through the throwing arc well and has a lively arm, along with the ability and sense to know when to vary his speed. He plants well to throw and the pass comes out with a tight spiral, putting a nice spin behind his long tosses. He displays very good quickness in his delivery, rarely showing even a hint of a wind-up. He is effective at planting his feet before throwing, but will throw off his back foot at times, taking some velocity off his passes. He is quick to load and while he does not appear to be a long-ball thrower, he is very efficient at moving the chains. The ball does come of his hand with good zip though, when he has time to release. On the move, he will throw with more of a ¾ release, which lets him get the ball out quicker. Arm Strength Maybe this scout needs a new pair of glasses, as I do not see an issue with his long ball execution, as the sphere rarely is feathered or hangs too long for the defender to get under. While I would not call his arm strength his most impressive trait, especially considering his lack of ideal size, I feel that McSorley can easily make every NFL throw, showing the ability to drive the football to the sideline on a line from the opposite hash. While that play is not called often, when it is, you can see he can send the ball 40-50 yards downfield with a flick of his wrist. He shows a tight spiral and the precision to get the ball through tight spaces when he sets his feet and does not stand flat-footed. He generates good velocity on his mid-range throws and has a really nice feel on those intermediate routes. When he does fail to put better zip behind his deep outs, the ball can hang when going long, but noticing him in practice, he can easily throw 50 yards downfield without putting too much “umph” behind his tosses. He shows very good ball rotation and solid strength behind his comeback routes. Most NFL teams vision him as a West Coast-type of passer, as he excels when working on moving the chains with short patterns, and he has good mechanics, as his spiral is tight on most deep throws and he can generate good air behind his fades. Accuracy McSorley has recorded two of the university's top passing efficiency ratings the last two years and shows very good accuracy on short routes, whether placing the ball along the sidelines or generating enough zip to thread the needle working in tight areas over the middle (has rectified his wind-up on those throws that used to affect his velocity). He showcases his ability to consistently throw receivers open vs. single coverage as a junior, demonstrating impressive improvement in this area from his time under center in 2016. (see 2017 Akron, Georgia State, Northwestern, Rutgers games). He delivers a tight spiral that is easily tracked and caught. He typically hits his receivers in stride whether on zipped crossing routes, touch passes dropped over the top of defenders or line drives leading receivers out of bounds on the deep out. He has good chemistry with receivers, as they do not need to adjust on their routes going for the ball in traffic. He has good touch underneath and last season, he showed excellent ability to put the ball where it is easier for his receiver to catch it. He is more accurate with his throws working vs. safeties and linebackers, doing a very good job of just dropping his tosses into the zone than challenging cornerbacks in the deep secondary. You can see on his short-to-intermediate throws that McSorley is very capable of hitting his receivers in stride with minimal adjustment on the wide-out’s part. He excels at snapping his head around quickly and this allows him to put good touch behind throws into the mid-range area. When he sets his feet properly, he has the ability to feather the ball into the receiver’s hands and get the pass over the outside shoulder of his target. He is very capable of reading the defender and coverage, knowing when to put zip on his throws or vary his speed. Touch McSorley will generally hit the receivers on time coming out of their breaks. He plays with good field alertness and makes good adjustments after making the pre-snap look. He has good anticipation skills and timing on crossing routes and throws a nice, catchable ball. He also displays a good feel for timing routes, knowing when to throw to the receiver just before his target becomes open. His touch on swings or when dropping it over the top is very impressive, as he seems to know when to let up or put zip to get the ball into tight areas. While Penn State’s offense was more designed for the short-to-intermediate game, the coaches had confidence in his arm strength to make all the throws. He makes proper adjustments and has the vision needed to scan the field on the move, but is not as effective when working under center (lacks great height to look over towering defenders). He looks off the defense and distributes the ball well, utilizing all of his receivers with effectiveness. He is quick looking off his primary targets when they are covered and he will go through progressions in order to avoid costly sacks. He shows the ability to keep the receiver in his route and has made steady improvement throwing quickly, especially on timing patterns. His touch is very evident on screens and short throws. He has this knack for knowing when to alter his release point, especially when pressured. With his solid field vision, and rhythm he has developed, McSorley would be a natural in a system featuring lots of play action, as he is a master at selling the play fake (see 2017 Indiana, Michigan, Maryland contests). Pocket Movement While McSorley has valid speed, he does show the ability to move around and step up in the pocket, He is just not a threat to run with the ball. He has enough agility to escape the rush, but does not have that burst to elude in long foot races. He is not the type that will look to move at the first sign of pressure, preferring to stand tall in the pocket to buy time and find his secondary targets when the pocket breaks down. He throws equally effective from the pocket when taking snaps under center or in the shotgun. He is better from the right hash than the left and there are times when he will lose velocity on the move when he reverts throwing too flat-footed. When he sees defensive schemes develop, he works hard to adjust. He has the change of direction agility to get enough movement to avoid the rush, but at the next level, due to size issues, he will have to get the ball off quicker to prevent from getting rag-dolled in the backfield.
  2. Who Impressed You This Week (Week 2: 9/8/2018)

    Ty Johnson of Maryland keeps coming up with the big play runs. He's featured at the 8:50 mark on this podcast; https://www.spreaker.com/episode/15678120
  3. Compare 2018 NFL Draft with the 2019 NFL Draft

    This is the year for the Hog Mollies and in the PURRFECT world, Wisconsin takes on Clemson for the title, pitting a Badgers offensive line that features as many as five first rounders vs. the Tigers DL that has the entire first unit likely walking across the podium. Jonathan Taylor might be the best back UW has ever produced, they have a Devin McCourty SS in D'Cota Dixon, a vastly underrated ILB in Ryan Connelly and the best blocking TE in college in Zach Neuville. Clemson's achilles heel could be the QB, as Bryant almost lost his job in fall camp. There is no "I gotta have" quarterback in this draft class, but watch several "who are theys" to emerge. Much like the characters from the Wizard of Oz, oh, if Stanford only had a QB! JJ Arcega-Whiteside has more potential than any SE in college and if they ever realize that their tight ends can catch, Kaden Smith is the Pac-12's best TE since Gronk. Do a google search on Smith-kid has the Guiness record - caught 48 passes in one minute - with one hand. You'd think they would get him the ball more than 23 times like they did in 2017. The RBs are shaping up to be Bryce Love & crowd, but guys, check out Maryland's Ty Johnson. To date, he's averaging 42.61 yards per TD run. No, not a typo guys, and girls. He runs a 4.28, is only 5;09, but has never fumbled or dropped the ball as a KOR, WR & RB in HS or college. Of my top 15 prospects, 13 are linemen, but I'm not sold on Oliver as the top boy, more so think Nick Bosa is the stud muffin in his family. No knock on Oliver, but the Aaron Donald comparison are ridiculous. I keep seeing more Kelly Gregg in him that the Rams standout. Keep an eye on Rashard Gary at Michigan though, as he has tremendous edge skills & when he rotates to the 3-tech, well, let's just say he is a master at block "destruction."
  4. Match The 2019 Quarterback Class To NFL Teams

    Comparing apples to oranges, but for Trace McSorley; DREW BREES-New Orleans…If Sean Payton could gaze into his crystal ball, he might see a transition from the Saints long-time franchise quarterback to McSorley in a few years. Like Brees, McSorley is very accurate in the short-to-intermediate passing game. Last season, he excelled at going through his progressions and showed great confidence in his safety vales – the tight ends. He is one heck of a competitor and with his leadership skills, it would be inviting to see him under the guidance of Payton as New Orleans has been searching for his eventual replacement. The best thing about McSorley is that he will do whatever it takes to get his team in position to score. He has the ability to be very creative making positive plays and he’s a veteran in the trenches when it comes to making reads and checks at the line of scrimmage. For Easton Stick; Dak Prescott-Dallas Cowboys...Stick is respected by his teammates and praised by the coaching staff for his ability to work within the system. He knows he can make things happen with his feet and that makes the opponent account for him at all times. He is a good “soldier” on the field, but in the NFL, you want to see him go vertical more often than he has at NDSU, but you can see he has the valid arm to make those throws and he has a good feel for defensive schemes to make quick pre-snap adjustments.
  5. Match The 2019 Quarterback Class To NFL Teams

    A little bit on Easton Stick; Set Up Stick shows good footwork and body control once he receives the snap. He has good foot quickness and is very agility moving around the backfield. He is the type that will not look to run at the first sign of pressure, but he has the strength to absorb pocket punishment. He has a quick release and has worked hard to show more patience and locating his secondary targets better before bolting on his own. Even though he operates mostly in the spread offense, he has taken a good portion of snaps in the classic formation and shows that he has the ability to drive back from center quickly as a pocket passer. With his quickness, playing in either formation should not be a problems once he gets a few more reps and becomes comfortable doing so under center. He can reach his throwing point with a normal stride and has the body control and agility needed to drive back from center quickly. When he steps into his throws, he is ready to unleash in an instant, doing a nice job sliding in and out of the pocket. Reading Defenses Stick is a good decision maker, when given time to scan the field. Yes, he does like to tuck the ball and run with it more than he should, but he does a decent job with his check-downs and is quick to read safeties and go over the top of coverage to complete passes with regularity (101-of-164 completions were for first downs in 2017 - see Missouri State, Indiana State, Sam Houston State games). He did have a stretch where he threw into double coverage last year (Western Illinois, Northern Iowa, South Dakota State games), but when utilizing multiple-receiver sets (especially tight ends), he does a nice job of scanning and looking off to locate his secondary targets. He is the type that will run with the ball rather than throw it away when his targets are covered, but there are those times when you will see him force the pass into traffic rather than take the sack. He needs to be more alert to backside pressure and must do a better job of distributing the ball and keeping it away from the defender to avoid costly sacks moving around the backfield. He is just the type that will work within the coaching system and take whatever the defense gives him. He seems to be more effective in the team’s “dink-&-dunk” system, but has the ability when throwing long (34 completions were for twenty yards or longer), as his arm strength is an asset. He looks very effective reading off coverage and does a solid job on underneath throws, play action and when executing up the seam. Release Stick has a quick over-the-top delivery with enough trajectories to get the balls over the head of defenders without getting many passes batted down at the line of scrimmage. He shows solid arm whip, but you still want to see more attempts to see if he has the NFL caliber power needed to be consistent on his long tosses. His velocity is much better when throwing short, but he has good finesse when going underneath or on play action and is always alert to secondary targets in attempts to stretch the field. He throws a tight spiral, even when having to go deep. He is not the type that needs a big wind-up to deliver the ball and it is rare to see his long throws will wobble some. He has good quickness in his release and while he’s not a long-arm thrower, he is quick to load. Under pressure, he knows how to get the ball off with better quickness, showing fluidness and smoothness in his release with no wasted motion. Arm Strength Stick is good at moving the chains and when he sets his feet properly and steps into his long throws, the ball will feather into the receiver's hands without his target having to break stride (see 2017 Missouri State, Western Illinois, South Dakota, Wofford games). He has shown very good zip on his 12-to-15-yard throws also. He is comfortable throwing on the move, rarely getting off-balanced and is conscious of not throwing off his back foot. He can step into his tosses to get air behind his deep ball, but the system used at the school calls for him to work underneath more than to be in a vertical attack. He can put good zip on his intermediate tosses and his long ball has good touch and trajectory. He appears to have good deep out and comeback strength to put more “umph” when trying to attack the deep zone. His passes show good ball rotation in the short area and his long ball fires out fast enough to keep the receiver from breaking off the route. He is a good outside hash thrower, but you just wish the NDSU system would open it up more to see if he has the valid vertical arm strength NFL teams require. Still, if you break down his deep passing game, during the second half of the 2017 schedule, you can see that Stick does a nice job when throwing across the body and while the long ball is not used often (team was lacking receivers needed to stretch the field), he has more than enough arm strength to air it out, putting the desired zip on the ball to get the ball deep throwing from the opposite hash (see San Diego, Wofford, Sam Houston State games). Accuracy This is his best asset. In the short passing game, Stick puts the ball where the receiver can catch it. He throws a catchable ball with zip or touch and does a nice job of keeping the receiver in the route. He is not the type that forces the receiver to adjust on crossing patterns and he knows how to take something off his passes when dumping off, as he can also drop the ball over the top. He showed better touch in 2017 on flares than he did in the past. He can also air it out well on his deep throws. When going long. Stick gets good velocity and timing behind his throws. He appears to have the valid arm power needed to lead the receivers going deep, as he can put good touch on those throws. When airing the ball out the last two years, Stick showed good improvement with his trajectory (in the past, when going long on the move, he did make his receivers adjust a bit). He has good touch on screen, along with zip on slants and hitches. He knows he has the arm power to lay it over the top deep down the seam and along the boundaries, but you'd just wish the coaches would let him go vertical more often.
  6. Match The 2019 Quarterback Class To NFL Teams

    Except of my report on Trace McSorley; Set Up McSorley is very efficient with his set-up and delivery of the ball. He has experience taking snaps from under center and shotgun. While he is not under center often, he does drop back quickly and shows good rhythm and timing, planting his back foot and driving the quick slant. Has a quick, over the top release and does an excellent job of finding clear passing lanes from which to throw. Even though his rushing numbers give you this indication, McSorley is not the type who will bolt at the first sign of pressure. He has nimble feet, showing functional foot speed to set up and retreat from the line of scrimmage to get to his throwing point. He has the body control to slide in the pocket and when he keeps his feet under him, displays the ability to throw on the move (will get flat-footed at times and this affects his velocity and accuracy). He gets good depth in his pass drop (3-5 step) and shows good upper and lower body mechanics. He is well-versed in a pro-style attack and carries the ball well. He has worked on developing a more compact motion, as he did wind up quite a bit during his sophomore season (resulted in high amounts of pass deflections, as defenders had good success setting up when he double-clutched). Reading Defenses McSorley makes lots of line calls operating out of the shotgun, but you would figure with his rushing ability that he would run with the ball more when pressured rather than try to force the ball into a crowd. In the NFL, he has one trait coaches love - the ability to make good progression reads. He will be patient waiting for things to develop, but he also has confidence in his ability to run with the ball when his primary and secondary targets are unavailable. He sees the field better operating out of the shotgun and while some scouts think he might have problems doing so under center, due to a lack of height, one only has to look at his completion numbers and ability to convert third-down plays (see 2017 Iowa, Northwestern, Michigan State, Washington games). Still, he is good at anticipating opportunities, leading to 282 touchdown passes and eleven scoring runs in 2017. He is very good at anticipating defensive schemes and will generally show good judgment, stepping up and out of pressure to buy time so his target can get open and despite just an average frame, he will stand tall and absorb punishment rather than force the ball into a crowd. With his nimble feet, he is considered a player who can be creative running with the ball. I like his toughness, as he is willing to take a sack rather than throw the ball up for grabs. He has developed enough that he no longer spends a lot of time hanging on to his primary targets, as he developed great confidence in his tight ends to utilize them as safety valves during the course of the 2017 season. He might miss a read every now and then, but has a short memory and will not let one play affect the way he performs the rest of the game. He is very quick and decisive picking up coverages and has good ability to read on the pre-snap. Despite a young and questionable protection from his offensive line, he will not force things just to make things happen. He takes what the defense gives him and is good at improvising. You can see on film that he has good timing and touch to move the chains rather than go for the “home run” ball, a perfect fit for a West Coast-type of offense. Release McSorley demonstrates the compact delivery and throwing motion, along with the wrist flick, to get the ball out cleanly and quickly. He has a compact motion, holding the ball chest-high to execute a fluid ¾ release. He gets the ball through the throwing arc well and has a lively arm, along with the ability and sense to know when to vary his speed. He plants well to throw and the pass comes out with a tight spiral, putting a nice spin behind his long tosses. He displays very good quickness in his delivery, rarely showing even a hint of a wind-up. He is effective at planting his feet before throwing, but will throw off his back foot at times, taking some velocity off his passes. He is quick to load and while he does not appear to be a long-ball thrower, he is very efficient at moving the chains. The ball does come of his hand with good zip though, when he has time to release. On the move, he will throw with more of a ¾ release, which lets him get the ball out quicker. Arm Strength Maybe this scout needs a new pair of glasses, as I do not see an issue with his long ball execution, as the sphere rarely is feathered or hangs too long for the defender to get under. While I would not call his arm strength his most impressive trait, especially considering his lack of ideal size, I feel that McSorley can easily make every NFL throw, showing the ability to drive the football to the sideline on a line from the opposite hash. While that play is not called often, when it is, you can see he can send the ball 40-50 yards downfield with a flick of his wrist. He shows a tight spiral and the precision to get the ball through tight spaces when he sets his feet and does not stand flat-footed. He generates good velocity on his mid-range throws and has a really nice feel on those intermediate routes. When he does fail to put better zip behind his deep outs, the ball can hang when going long, but noticing him in practice, he can easily throw 50 yards downfield without putting too much “umph” behind his tosses. He shows very good ball rotation and solid strength behind his comeback routes. Most NFL teams vision him as a West Coast-type of passer, as he excels when working on moving the chains with short patterns, and he has good mechanics, as his spiral is tight on most deep throws and he can generate good air behind his fades. Accuracy McSorley has recorded two of the university's top passing efficiency ratings the last two years and shows very good accuracy on short routes, whether placing the ball along the sidelines or generating enough zip to thread the needle working in tight areas over the middle (has rectified his wind-up on those throws that used to affect his velocity). He showcases his ability to consistently throw receivers open vs. single coverage as a junior, demonstrating impressive improvement in this area from his time under center in 2016. (see 2017 Akron, Georgia State, Northwestern, Rutgers games). He delivers a tight spiral that is easily tracked and caught. He typically hits his receivers in stride whether on zipped crossing routes, touch passes dropped over the top of defenders or line drives leading receivers out of bounds on the deep out. He has good chemistry with receivers, as they do not need to adjust on their routes going for the ball in traffic. He has good touch underneath and last season, he showed excellent ability to put the ball where it is easier for his receiver to catch it. He is more accurate with his throws working vs. safeties and linebackers, doing a very good job of just dropping his tosses into the zone than challenging cornerbacks in the deep secondary. You can see on his short-to-intermediate throws that McSorley is very capable of hitting his receivers in stride with minimal adjustment on the wide-out’s part. He excels at snapping his head around quickly and this allows him to put good touch behind throws into the mid-range area. When he sets his feet properly, he has the ability to feather the ball into the receiver’s hands and get the pass over the outside shoulder of his target. He is very capable of reading the defender and coverage, knowing when to put zip on his throws or vary his speed.
  7. Match The 2019 Quarterback Class To NFL Teams

    I know Herbert is getting lots of love, but to me, he's Joey Harrington waiting to happen. He's yet to play a full season and makes a scary first round investment as a first rounder. For my money, Trace McSorley would be ideal to change the culture in Tampa Bay. Winston just does not seem like a guy I want to hand 20 mil to next year. If not for the Bridgewater trade, Trace would have been ideal caddying for Brees in NoLa. One kid to keep an eye on - Easton Stick-North Dakota State. He's a pretty mobile QB, smart, stepped in when Wentz got hurt a few years back, more a Rich Gannon type with a dash of Jimmy G, perhaps why NE had scouts there last week & also plan several visits. The Chargers and Pats will eventually need to address the aging QB scene, but I doubt either will invest a first rounder. Will Grier might be an option in round 2, more so for LA, as NE has two guys they are examining early, Stick & Mississippi State bad boy, Nick Fitzgerald. Don't forget a Heisman darkhorse at U of A - Khalil Tate if he bolts. Coughlin could see him as a bigger version of Russell Wilson for Jax, as I am not drinking the bug juice that Bortles is his man. from, Dave-Te Thomas
  8. Good starting point. I am working on a report for several teams on a vastly underrated TE at Louisville that teams are likening to Jeremy Shockey - Micky Crum. DO NOT look at his current stats. The kid is one of those Bo Jackson-like training program nuts. He was in the doghouse by Petrino, but he let him out to play this spring and he popped for 8 big receptions in the spring game. Just 23 receptions in 28 games so far, but after his frosh troubles, Petrino utilized him as a blocking machine - last year - 76 knockdowns, 20 downfield blocks. He put the bench up at 510 lbs this spring at 6:05.2-254. He could be that position's Cinderella story. While not eligible for the draft, Louisville's new soph QB Juwon Pass checks in at 6:05.1-233 & ran a 4.38 in spring camp. No, nobody knocks off the Clemson powerhouse in the ACC, but the Cardinals might be ready to make big noise - if their OL can only learn how to protect the QB. One other sleeper-Parris Campbell gets the ink, but Ohio State's Johnny Dixon might surpass him on the draft boards, as he finally gets the starting flanker job this year. In breaking down Big Ten film this summer, there is a right tackle at Indiana with Jake Conklin-like ability - Brandon Knight. Another OT that seems to be on the cusp is that 354-pound LOT at Minney-Donnell Greene & check out that RB Rodney Smith - kid has that Freeman McNeal uncanny low pad lateral skills. Wisconsin has a load of talent, but this could be the year that the unleash LB Ryan Connelley & their sleeper TE Zander Neuville will get lots of microscope like scouting this year. Another Sam Beal like CB is emerging from the junior ranks, but at another Michigan - Central. He's slight of frame, but Sean Bunting might have excellent ball theft ability
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