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2019 Quarterback Class

Top Quarterbacks in the 2019 NFL Draft Class  

98 members have voted

  1. 1. Who's the best QB so far in the 2019 draft class?

    • Drew Lock, Missouri
      22
    • Jarrett Stidham, Auburn
      11
    • Justin Herbert, Oregon
      14
    • Shea Patterson, Michigan
      6
    • Clayton Thorson, Northwestern
      6
    • Ryan Finley, N.C. State
      3
    • Deondre Francois, Florida State
      5
    • Will Grier, West Virginia
      10
    • Jake Browning, Washington
      3
    • Jacob Eason, Washington
      4
    • Nick Fitzgerald, Mississippi State
      3
    • Jake Bentley, South Carolina
      1
    • Trace McSorley, Penn State
      8
    • Kelly Bryant, Clemson
      0
    • Other
      2


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40 minutes ago, Oregon Ducks said:

Herbert is a better prospect than MariGOATa...I said it...

That is not saying much honestly.  I never thought Mariota in the grand scheme of things was this all time great QB.  He is a good NFL player but they have to specifically tailor the offense to things he does well and away from this he does not do well in the NFL.  You cannot just go out and win a ton of games with him regardless of the system.  Putting him into a more run based system where he can playaction pass off it and bootleg is smart.  Still does have a long ways to go in his career and things could change but yeah.  Talent wise it is not even close, Herbert has better arm talent and size.  But Marcus Mariota is by far an away a better leader, has better on field demeanor and has better poise not to mention probably better character overall.  So in that regard no way is Herbert better than Mariota.   Will see what Herbert does against Washington who is arguably the only really good secondary and defense overall he will play all year long outside of a bowl game potentially.  Stanford's defense is not all that great, no where near a few years ago, and Utah is solid but nothing amazing I do not think, Cal could surprise some defensively but still.

 

 

 

On 9/2/2018 at 11:28 AM, Classic said:

After last night's awful showing by Shea Patterson and the Michigan offense. Shea should never see a nfl field if he turns ball over like he did last night.

What?  Shea Patterson was not the reason for that loss, the offensive line was, especially the side with Runyan and Bredeson.  Those two made some of the Notre Dame defensive lineman look like 1st team All Americans.  Not to mention Patterson showed more emotion and pride after that loss than some of his teammates did who have been on Michigan for 3-4 years.  

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Deondre Francois jumped up my list after last night. I know they got rocked but he was NOT the problem. Kid has all the arm talent you want in a NFL caliber QB prospect and dropped some dimes that his receivers flat out dropped. He was decisive in his decisions and made a few NFL throws. It's too bad Willie Taggart's offense isn't going to feature him. 

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For those interested in small school prospects. After game one Easton Stick appears improved. His arm strength appears to have taken a jump. The game didn’t offer him a lot of opportunity to throw the ball but he looked better. As someone mentioned earlier Stick had a low number of attempts but that’s just the way NDSU operates. Wentz had the same criticism. And actually this year might see even less passing by NDSU that team is loaded at that level of competition. Stick just needs to make the most of his limited opportunities. He could be a solid round 5-7 type of pick. I doubt he climbs up the boards like Carson.

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Don't Count the "Little Man" Out  - Penn State's Trace McSorley

Athletic Ability                     McSorley has the functional arm strength that allows him to make all of his throws. Some might question his deep ball ability, but he completed nearly 17% of his passes for twenty yards or longer in 2017 (see Akron, Georgia State, Indiana, Michigan State games). He shows good feet and enough balance and quickness to slide and avoid the pass rush, but will not win many foot races in the open field, rather masterfully setting up the defender to bite early with his hip shake and head fakes. He is quick dropping back from the line of scrimmage to his set point. He displays good coordination on the move and the body control to move around the pocket with ease. When he throws flat-footed and fails to set his feet, he loses zip and velocity on his long throws, though. He is fearless under pressure, knowing just the right time to tuck-&-run with the ball (see 2017 Akron, Pittsburgh,, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, Washington games). Even though he generally plays in the shotgun, you can see that he has the ability to get back and set up quickly. He compensates for a lack of great height with quick decision-passing, even though there are times where he struggles to get the ball over defensive linemen in tight areas (see 2017 Iowa, Michigan State, Washington games). Much like the Seahawks' Russell Wilson, his savvy and ability to side-step the pass rush allows him to stay alive in the pocket. He may be the most opportunistic running quarterback in this draft class, even though Mississippi State's Nick Fitzgerald has two 1,000-yard seasons.

 

Football Sense                    McSorley is a cerebral quarterback who is rarely fooled by coverage. He makes strong pre-snap reads and demonstrated improvement as a junior in manipulating the defense with his eyes and legs (see 2017 Akron, Michigan, Nebraska games). He shows good poise in a muddy backfield, stepping up to avoid the rush and challenging linebackers to either commit to stopping him from scrambling or dropping off to cover receivers behind them. He is more than willing to scramble, but he also does a nice job of keeping his eyes downfield until the last possible second. He is quick to retain plays, having no problem taking them from the board to the field. He has good field vision and makes quick decisions and adjustments before the snap, doing an excellent job of calling audibles. He stands tall under pressure to buy time for his receivers to get open. He is quick to pick up the hot reads, checks and route progressions. He spends the extra hours studying game films and can pick up schemes easily. His intelligence test score indicates he is capable of handling the mental aspect of the game. He is at the “top of his game” when not pressured and this “sharp kid” has a nice touch on the ball. You saw in 2017 that he made marked improvement making calls at the line of scrimmage (see Akron, Georgia State, Rutgers games).

 

Set Up                   McSorley is very efficient with his set-up and delivery of the ball. He has experience taking snaps from under center and shotgun. While he is not under center often, he does drop back quickly and shows good rhythm and timing, planting his back foot and driving the quick slant. Has a quick, over the top release and does an excellent job of finding clear passing lanes from which to throw. Even though his rushing numbers give you this indication, McSorley is not the type who will bolt at the first sign of pressure. He has nimble feet, showing functional foot speed to set up and retreat from the line of scrimmage to get to his throwing point. He has the body control to slide in the pocket and when he keeps his feet under him, displays the ability to throw on the move (will get flat-footed at times and this affects his velocity and accuracy). He gets good depth in his pass drop (3-5 step) and shows good upper and lower body mechanics. He is well-versed in a pro-style attack and carries the ball well. He has worked on developing a more compact motion, as he did wind up quite a bit during his sophomore season (resulted in high amounts of pass deflections, as defenders had good success setting up when he double-clutched).

 

Reading Defenses                             McSorley makes lots of line calls operating out of the shotgun, but you would figure with his rushing ability that he would run with the ball more when pressured rather than try to force the ball into a crowd. In the NFL, he has one trait coaches love - the ability to make good progression reads. He will be patient waiting for things to develop, but he also has confidence in his ability to run with the ball when his primary and secondary targets are unavailable. He sees the field better operating out of the shotgun and while some scouts think he might have problems doing so under center, due to a lack of height, one only has to look at his completion numbers and ability to convert third-down plays (see 2017 Iowa, Northwestern, Michigan State, Washington games). Still, he is good at anticipating opportunities, leading to 282 touchdown passes and eleven scoring runs in 2017. He is  very good at anticipating defensive schemes and will generally show good judgment, stepping up and out of pressure to buy time so his target can get open and despite just an average frame, he will stand tall and absorb punishment rather than force the ball into a crowd. With his nimble feet, he is considered a player who can be creative running with the ball. I like his toughness, as he is willing to take a sack rather than throw the ball up for grabs. He has developed enough that he no longer spends a lot of time hanging on to his primary targets, as he developed great confidence in his tight ends to utilize them as safety valves during the course of the 2017 season. He might miss a read every now and then, but has a short memory and will not let one play affect the way he performs the rest of the game. He is very quick and decisive picking up coverages and has good ability to read on the pre-snap. Despite a young and questionable protection from his offensive line, he will not force things just to make things happen. He takes what the defense gives him and is good at improvising. You can see on film that he has good timing and touch to move the chains rather than go for the “home run” ball, a perfect fit for a West Coast-type of offense.

 

Release                                McSorley demonstrates the compact delivery and throwing motion, along with the wrist flick, to get the ball out cleanly and quickly. He has a compact motion, holding the ball chest-high to execute a fluid ¾ release. He gets the ball through the throwing arc well and has a lively arm, along with the ability and sense to know when to vary his speed. He plants well to throw and the pass comes out with a tight spiral, putting a nice spin behind his long tosses. He displays very good quickness in his delivery, rarely showing even a hint of a wind-up. He is effective at planting his feet before throwing, but will throw off his back foot at times, taking some velocity off his passes. He is quick to load and while he does not appear to be a long-ball thrower, he is very efficient at moving the chains. The ball does come of his hand with good zip though, when he has time to release. On the move, he will throw with more of a ¾ release, which lets him get the ball out quicker.

 

Arm Strength                       Maybe this scout needs a new pair of glasses, as I do not see an issue with his long ball execution, as the sphere rarely is feathered or hangs too long for the defender to get under. While I would not call his arm strength his most impressive trait, especially considering his lack of ideal size, I feel that McSorley can easily make every NFL throw, showing the ability to drive the football to the sideline on a line from the opposite hash. While that play is not called often, when it is, you can see he can send the ball 40-50 yards downfield with a flick of his wrist. He shows a tight spiral and the precision to get the ball through tight spaces when he sets his feet and does not stand flat-footed. He generates good velocity on his mid-range throws and has a really nice feel on those intermediate routes. When he does fail to put better zip behind his deep outs, the ball can hang when going long, but noticing him in practice, he can easily throw 50 yards downfield without putting too much “umph” behind his tosses. He shows very good ball rotation and solid strength behind his comeback routes. Most NFL teams vision him as a West Coast-type of passer, as he excels when working on moving the chains with short patterns, and he has good mechanics, as his spiral is tight on most deep throws and he can generate good air behind his fades.

 

Accuracy                              McSorley has recorded two of the university's top passing efficiency ratings the last two years and shows very good accuracy on short routes, whether placing the ball along the sidelines or generating enough zip to thread the needle working in tight areas over the middle (has rectified his wind-up on those throws that used to affect his velocity). He showcases his ability to consistently throw receivers open vs. single coverage as a junior, demonstrating impressive improvement in this area from his time under center in 2016. (see 2017 Akron, Georgia State, Northwestern, Rutgers games). He delivers a tight spiral that is easily tracked and caught. He typically hits his receivers in stride whether on zipped crossing routes, touch passes dropped over the top of defenders or line drives leading receivers out of bounds on the deep out. He has good chemistry with receivers, as they do not need to adjust on their routes going for the ball in traffic. He has good touch underneath and last season, he showed excellent ability to put the ball where it is easier for his receiver to catch it. He is more accurate with his throws working vs. safeties and linebackers, doing a very good job of just dropping his tosses into the zone than challenging cornerbacks in the deep secondary. You can see on his short-to-intermediate throws that McSorley is very capable of hitting his receivers in stride with minimal adjustment on the wide-out’s part. He excels at snapping his head around quickly and this allows him to put good touch behind throws into the mid-range area. When he sets his feet properly, he has the ability to feather the ball into the receiver’s hands and get the pass over the outside shoulder of his target. He is very capable of reading the defender and coverage, knowing when to put zip on his throws or vary his speed.

 

Touch                    McSorley will generally hit the receivers on time coming out of their breaks. He plays with good field alertness and makes good adjustments after making the pre-snap look. He has good anticipation skills and timing on crossing routes and throws a nice, catchable ball. He also displays a good feel for timing routes, knowing when to throw to the receiver just before his target becomes open. His touch on swings or when dropping it over the top is very impressive, as he seems to know when to let up or put zip to get the ball into tight areas. While Penn State’s offense was more designed for the short-to-intermediate game, the coaches had confidence in his arm strength to make all the throws. He makes proper adjustments and has the vision needed to scan the field on the move, but is not as effective when working under center (lacks great height to look over towering defenders). He looks off the defense and distributes the ball well, utilizing all of his receivers with effectiveness. He is quick looking off his primary targets when they are covered and he will go through progressions in order to avoid costly sacks. He shows the ability to keep the receiver in his route and has made steady improvement throwing quickly, especially on timing patterns. His touch is very evident on screens and short throws. He has this knack for knowing when to alter his release point, especially when pressured. With his solid field vision, and rhythm he has developed, McSorley would be a natural in a system featuring lots of play action, as he is a master at selling the play fake (see 2017 Indiana, Michigan, Maryland contests).

 

Pocket Movement                              While McSorley has valid speed, he does show the ability to move around and step up in the pocket, He is just not a threat to run with the ball. He has enough agility to escape the rush, but does not have that burst to elude in long foot races. He is not the type that will look to move at the first sign of pressure, preferring to stand tall in the pocket to buy time and find his secondary targets when the pocket breaks down. He throws equally effective from the pocket when taking snaps under center or in the shotgun. He is better from the right hash than the left and there are times when he will lose velocity on the move when he reverts throwing too flat-footed. When he sees defensive schemes develop, he works hard to adjust. He has the change of direction agility to get enough movement to avoid the rush, but at the next level, due to size issues, he will have to get the ball off quicker to prevent from getting rag-dolled in the backfield.

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On 9/10/2018 at 1:56 PM, Calvert28 said:

Liking the post above for effort. 

Too bad it got wasted on a CFL quarterback

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7 minutes ago, IDOG_det said:

Too bad it got wasted on a CFL quarterback

There will be hundreds of scouting reports on guys like Lock, Hebert, etc. These small time prospects need some spotlight.

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2 minutes ago, Calvert28 said:

There will be hundreds of scouting reports on guys like Lock, Hebert, etc. These small time prospects need some spotlight.

A Penn State QB with Heisman talk is not "small time". Some people are comparing McSorely to Baker Mayfield. He is already given too much of a spotlight.

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11 hours ago, IDOG_det said:

A Penn State QB with Heisman talk is not "small time". Some people are comparing McSorely to Baker Mayfield. He is already given too much of a spotlight.

Who the hell is calling McSorley a Heisman candidate? That's insane. Also, he's a non-prospect.

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Feel like Stidham is the only guy with real NFL potential. Grier has a chance as well, but he's more a 2nd/3rd round developmental guy. Everyone else is a really good back up.

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4 hours ago, BleedTheClock said:

 

Who the hell is calling McSorley a Heisman candidate? That's insane. Also, he's a non-prospect.

He's gotten some attention for it over the past year 

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Brady White, QB for Memphis, looks pretty good. His throws were sticking out when I was watching RB Darrell Henderson. He's had some pretty good pockets to work with, but it looks like he goes through his progressions and delivers darts. This is based soley on his game vs Georgia St.

Edited by Jeezla

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