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dll2000

The New Scheme RPOs

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Isnt it nice that Bears are near forefront of trend for once?

 

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21 hours ago, dll2000 said:

Isnt it nice that Bears are near forefront of trend for once?

Sort of? All these hybrid defenses, and semi-interchangeable personnel will make the RPO just another offensive wrinkle very soon, though. 

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10 hours ago, Heinz D. said:

Sort of? All these hybrid defenses, and semi-interchangeable personnel will make the RPO just another offensive wrinkle very soon, though. 

Agreed. Schemes will adjust keys to counteract the effectiveness in some way, and then offenses will change something else, then the defenses will, etc. etc. 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/3/2018 at 1:19 PM, Heinz D. said:

Sort of? All these hybrid defenses, and semi-interchangeable personnel will make the RPO just another offensive wrinkle very soon, though. 

They already have. PA and RPO are virtually the same thing now.

The original idea and concept behind the RPO has turned into what we WERE calling "play-action" a few years ago. But the ideas and responsibilites behind them have changed over the years. 

In short; the original RPO was meant to be used on option on run plays to make it look like a QB was passing and stall the front-7 and if the defense began to get savvy to it, they could use that same option to throw to short range routes as an option (shallow route, bend, etc).

The original play-action was meant to be used for a respectful run game in order to stall the front-7 and the safeties just long enough to open up the deep pass game. 

Nowadays, coaches are intertwining both concepts and ideas so much that there are virtually no difference between them anymore. 

And like you said, very soon, other coaches will catch on just like every other "new" offensive play-calling in the past. 

Edited by JustAnotherFan

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The RPO with a mobile QB is almost impossible to actually defend.

You really have 3 options off the exact same hand off, RB run, QB run, Pass.

If the offense reads it write and executes it is almost impossible outside of an incredible defensive play, to stop it. The problem is the right read requires a QB, RB and WR/TE to be in lock step about what is going to happen.

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On 6/5/2018 at 11:53 AM, WindyCity said:

The RPO with a mobile QB is almost impossible to actually defend.

You really have 3 options off the exact same hand off, RB run, QB run, Pass.

If the offense reads it write and executes it is almost impossible outside of an incredible defensive play, to stop it. The problem is the right read requires a QB, RB and WR/TE to be in lock step about what is going to happen.

And if your QB does decide to keep it, he had better get his yards and get the **** down.

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On 6/5/2018 at 11:53 AM, WindyCity said:

The RPO with a mobile QB is almost impossible to actually defend.

You really have 3 options off the exact same hand off, RB run, QB run, Pass.

If the offense reads it write and executes it is almost impossible outside of an incredible defensive play, to stop it. The problem is the right read requires a QB, RB and WR/TE to be in lock step about what is going to happen.

Nothing is unstoppable or everyone would do it all the time. Then they would change rules.  

Main draw back of RPOs is OL is run blocking. So it has to happen before linemen are downfield - or is it upfield? past line of scrimmage by 2-3 yards is what I mean. I think NFL rule is 1, but they usually call it by college rule which I think is 3. I would have to look it up.  In any event, that means DBs can play up more if they suspect an RPO and make life difficult. 

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On 6/15/2018 at 9:42 AM, dll2000 said:

Nothing is unstoppable or everyone would do it all the time. Then they would change rules.  

Main draw back of RPOs is OL is run blocking. So it has to happen before linemen are downfield - or is it upfield? past line of scrimmage by 2-3 yards is what I mean. I think NFL rule is 1, but they usually call it by college rule which I think is 3. I would have to look it up.  In any event, that means DBs can play up more if they suspect an RPO and make life difficult. 

This is where speed kills them though - if/when they guess wrong on this is when Cohen or Turbo beat them down the seam for 60 yards. 

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