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Here's also this article, prettyhttp://www.optimumscouting.com/news/who-has-the-juice-nfl-quarterback-whisperers... Pretty interesting... looking at ANY/A as an indicator of offensive success (but also admitting the correlation between coaches being rated high in this metric also having a top tier qb attached to them. 

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In an attempt to measure the quarterback success of these so-called quarterback whisperers, I took a look at the ANY/A track record of every coach in the sport who touches a quarterback. This includes current head coaches and offensive coordinators with an offensive passing game background (positionally coached quarterbacks, receivers or tight ends) and all of the league’s quarterbacks coaches. I measured the ANY/A Value (essentially plus-minus for adjusted passing yards) for every coach when he was in a position of accountability over a quarterback (head coach, offensive coordinator or quarterbacks coach).... 

First of all, the trio in New Orleans (head coach Sean Payton, offensive coordinator Pete Carmichael and quarterbacks coach Joe Lombardi) stick out like a sore thumb. They have been together for the majority of Drew Brees’ Hall of Fame run in New Orleans, with Lombardi only leaving for a two-year stint of slightly above average passing production as Detroit’s offensive coordinator in 2014 and 2015. In circumstances like theirs, where these coaches have been so locked into a quarterback for so long, it is harder to parse out who really has the juice.

 

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As I'm digging deeper, I'm liking Lombardi more and more... He's become my favorite:

https://www.mlive.com/lions/index.ssf/2015/11/detroit_lions_joe_lombardi_2.html

It's unreasonable to pin all those issues on one individual, but Lombardi isn't interested in pointing fingers. He's only comfortable admitting he didn't perform his own job well enough. 

"Listen, when it's the offense and you're the offensive coordinator, you have to take responsibility for it," he said. "There are a lot of variables that could have been different, that could have made it better, and enough of those were within my control. I try to focus on those."

... Lombardi wasn't particularity interested in talking about his regrets coaching with the Lions. He doesn't want it to look like he is trying to pin blame on anyone else other than himself. But he bemoans not being able to do more to improve the team's ground game.

"When we were at our best in New Orleans, it was when we had an effective running game," he said. "It didn't necessarily have to be overpowering, but it was efficient. We struggled to get to that point. There's a lot of reasons why that happened.

"If you had it to do it over again, I don't have the answers for how exactly I would do it, but I would have tried to spend more time on that part of the game, where we got that better."

The best example from his time in New Orleans would be the 2011 squad, which set an NFL record for yards in a season. Quarterback Drew Brees set the single-season mark for passing yards and the Saints averaged an impressive 4.9 yards per carry and 2,127 total yards on the ground.

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