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Heimdallr

The Zim-Zam Flim-Flam: All Things Zimmer

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A lot of credit for the Vikings success to this point has to be given to head coach Mike Zimmer. The tough coach has helped to turn around the defense and change the mentality of the franchise since his arrival in 2014.

One person who is very pleased with Zimmer is former Minnesota head coach Bud Grant. With a similar tough coaching style, Grant led the Vikings from 1967 to 1983 plus one more season in 1985 and had the team winning 62.1% of their games as well as the 1969 NFL Championship.

Grant: “He understands defense, but he also understands one of the most important things in coaching is you have to understand the personalities and put them in the right spots. He understands who can play and puts them in position to be successful. He is a great defensive coach.”

https://thevikingage.com/2017/11/02/bud-grant-minnesota-vikings-mike-zimmer/

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Zimmer: “I think they believe. I think they believed before, but the more you win and you go into somebody else’s stadium and win against a good football team, I think it continues to add to your confidence as we go forward. They were happy in the locker room, but they understand that we haven’t done anything yet.”

http://www.1500espn.com/vikings-2/2017/12/zimmer-says-vikings-starting-believe/

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He's already 36- 24 with his worst season being 7-9. Can't ask for much more during the regular season.

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29 minutes ago, disaacs said:

very much so.

particularly liked his exchange with Iloka and the CIN coach about him. as a vike daddy i am fixated on fatherhood, and it's obvious that Zimmer, who mainly had daughters, sees many of these players as his sons.

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1 minute ago, SemperFeist said:

I remember how much Zimmer wanted to get Iloka to Minnesota. He wasn’t coy about it, either. 

He wants his 6'5 220 athletic S.

I truly believe he was trying to hit on Kearse and hope it could turn out to be the same type of thing Iloka is.

 

He must really see some sort of an advantage in it.

 

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1 hour ago, vike daddy said:

it's obvious that Zimmer, who mainly had daughters, sees many of these players as his sons.

i think he may see Terrence Newman that way too.

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1 hour ago, gopherwrestler said:

He wants his 6'5 220 athletic S.

I truly believe he was trying to hit on Kearse and hope it could turn out to be the same type of thing Iloka is.

 

He must really see some sort of an advantage in it.

 

When tight ends are more athletic than most linebackers, and generally range in that 6’5” - 6’6” area, a 6’5” safety would be a huge (no pun intended) chess piece. 

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21 minutes ago, SemperFeist said:

When tight ends are more athletic than most linebackers, and generally range in that 6’5” - 6’6” area, a 6’5” safety would be a huge (no pun intended) chess piece. 

While not exactly a direct correlation, I know a certain team that has a really athletic TE.  

http://www.vikings.com/media-vault/videos/NFLN-Patriots-or-Vikings-Who-Has-The-Edge/b2466a42-aa7f-4bf5-8932-dc79efb1e66f

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Everyone in the NFL wants illegal blindside hits like the one Panthers linebacker Thomas Davis delivered to Packers receiver Davante Adams out of the game. The NFL suspended Davis, and Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said “the NFL is trying to do an awful lot” to make the game safer.

“I think it’s important we try to take the hits to the head out of the game best we can,” Zimmer said Wednesday, via Andrew Krammer of the Minneapolis Star Tribune. “You don’t want to see people get hurt or get injured.”

Zimmer, though, said NFL players can do more to protect each other. One of Zimmer’s recommendations is for quarterbacks to better protect receivers by making judicious throws over the middle, keeping the pass-catcher out of harm’s way as best they can.

“The whole league has changed in the 20 years I’ve been in the league you know,” Zimmer said. “I guess I’m a defensive coach. A lot of times these quarterbacks throw the ball in the middle of the field and these safeties are coming to make a play on the ball. Quite honestly the ball shouldn’t have been thrown. Back in the day the ball wouldn’t have been thrown.

“We have to adapt to the rules. The hard part especially for the safeties is when they’re catching the ball and the guy is going down, you’ve lowered your target, but he continues to go lower. Now you have to try to, in about the time it takes a golf ball to come off a club face, to move your target to another spot, which is almost totally impossible. I think they could take a bunch of these plays out if the quarterbacks wouldn’t throw the ball into places they shouldn’t throw the ball.”

Zimmer’s own safety, Andrew Sendejo, served a one-game suspension for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Ravens receiver Mike Wallace. It was the type of play Zimmer was referring.

“It’s something like that, yeah,” Zimmer said. “You see it all the time. I think there was one the other night in the Tampa Bay game and Atlanta. That’s just my opinion. No one cares.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/12/20/mike-zimmer-calls-on-nfl-players-to-do-more-to-protect-each-other/

 

classic Zim.

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In this episode of 96 Questions With Brian Robison, Brian asks a bunch of different Vikings: if Mike Zimmer were Santa Claus, who would be his biggest helper?

Most said Everson Griffen ("because he's always kissing Zim's a**," chuckled Rashod Hill), but others said it would be Terence, Xavier, Eric Wilson, Zimmer's son Adam, or Robison himself. 

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1 hour ago, y*so*blu said:

In this episode of 96 Questions With Brian Robison, Brian asks a bunch of different Vikings: if Mike Zimmer were Santa Claus, who would be his biggest helper?

Most said Everson Griffen ("because he's always kissing Zim's a**," chuckled Rashod Hill), but others said it would be Terence, Xavier, Eric Wilson, Zimmer's son Adam, or Robison himself. 

Last year, I bet someone would've said Cap because he's so small.

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The candidates for 2017 Coach of the Year  include, in no particular order, the following men:

Doug Pederson, Eagles: From fourth place in the NFC East a year ago to, as soon as Monday night, the No. 1 seed in the conference. Who legitimately expected the Eagles to win the NFC East? Few did, and the team’s rise not just to the top of the division but the top of the NFC makes Pederson a prime candidate for the honor.

Mike Zimmer, Vikings: A disastrous 2016 had a here-we-go-again vibe early, with the mysterious post-Week One knee injury to quarterback Sam Bradford and the Week Four ACL tear suffered by talented rookie Dalvin Cook. A loss in that same game to the Lions dropped the Vikings to 2-2. Since then, they’ve gone 10-1. And Zimmer has done it in a season after having more than a half-dozen eye surgeries.

Doug Marrone, Jaguars: The pieces were generally there a year ago, but the performance definitely wasn’t. This year, an unlikely AFC South crown and a still-lingering shot at a bye justifies consideration for Marrone. Cutting against his candidacy is the lingering presence of, as defensive lineman Malik Jackson referred to him during Friday’s PFT Live, “Coach Coughlin.”

Bill Belichick, Patriots: Another year, another 12-win season. Another No. 1 seed. Another run looming for the Super Bowl. The greatest coach of all time deserves consideration for the annual honor, especially given the glaring evidence provided eight days ago, in a head to head game against the Steelers, about the value of a stubborn adherence to and respect for situational football. Even if he’s not the coach of the year, he’s the coach any team should want, in every year.

Sean Payton, Saints: Three straight years of 7-9 quickly has become a balanced offense and balanced roster that likely will win the division — and that could perform well on the road in the postseason. Payton deserves credit for resolving the Adrian Peterson situation and realizing that Alvin Kamara had the skills as a rookie to carry a significant workload.

Ron Rivera, Panthers: From managing Cam Newton‘s shoulder injury to finding a way to balance Newton as a runner and a thrower, Rivera has presided over a turnaround that has the Panthers still alive for a division title, and very much in the hunt for a Super Bowl appearance.

Sean McVay, Rams: Recent wins at Seattle and Tennessee have rocketed McVay to the top of the list for many, and for good reason. In his first year, McVay has taken a 4-12 roster and turned it into something special. The fact that he’s doing it at the age of 31 could be the tiebreaker for plenty of voters.

Pete Carroll, Seahawks: Racked by injuries and lingering roster weaknesses, Carroll nevertheless has his team in striking distance for a playoff berth. If they make it, he deserves to be at least mentioned.

John Harbaugh, Ravens: A litany of injuries and chronic offensive struggles made it hard to pile up wins early. But they kept chugging and overachieving and could end up with a playoff berth — to the dismay of teams like New England and Pittsburgh.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/12/25/coach-of-the-year-is-a-multi-horse-race/

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