Jump to content

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Danand said:

Came in here to post the same tweet. Good thing he lost some weight, he carried some bad weight last year and I think it showed.

he still had his best year in the late season in 2018, and would be a great addition if he can provide the same. carrying 4 RB's would be a lot, so special teams will be a deciding factor

Yup. Either that or perhaps Hill goes down with a “camp injury”. Fast RBs of his ilk have been known to have issues with their hamstrings... if you catch my drift.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, diamondbull424 said:

Yup. Either that or perhaps Hill goes down with a “camp injury”. Fast RBs of his ilk have been known to have issues with their hamstrings... if you catch my drift.

I don't think Hill is in danger of one of those injuries. Last year we had Gus being the gammer, and Dixon the more allround type of back. Now we have Ingram to be the allround back, so I believe Dixon and Edwards are the two who we should look at as a battle in TC. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just don't find anyway Dixon makes it out of training camp. I'll be very surprised if that happened. I think he's traded for a 5th before its all said and done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RavensfanRD said:

I just don't find anyway Dixon makes it out of training camp. I'll be very surprised if that happened. I think he's traded for a 5th before its all said and done.

Final year of his deal and the other team has all the leverage. A conditional 6th is likely the best we can get. A 7th or a release being most realistic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, DreamKid said:

 

Meh. While I think this says a lot about their ability to handle the rock once going, I’m guessing they must be crediting Lamar with those fumbled handoffs, even the ones that Edwards had but didn’t properly tuck.

Perhaps an offseason to work on handoffs with Lamar will solve the issue, but Edwards was the only running back last season that had an issue with receiving his handoffs. He was too aggressive and didn’t wait for the ball to be put into his chest. He would look to grab it.

Just saying. If we continue to run a lot of read option, guys that can take handoffs effectively will be crucial. If Ingram and Hill can do that, then I would be very much more comfortable giving those other guys more opportunities this season... unless Edwards has corrected his issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/25/2019 at 10:19 PM, DreamKid said:

 

Exactly why he needs to be scrapped. Too often Lamar was caught off guard with his high and low snaps. Lamar can improve his own fumbling issue, but between Gus and Skura, a few of his fumbles are on those guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Marquise will bring to our offense, shown here by another Marquise already in the NFL. 

To put it mildly, he's just so F*&$ing fast.

 

You better know where he is every play, and defend him properly. Or you're risking 6. He'll create on his own, and open things up underneath as he stretches defenses out. We aren't going to be the pushovers everyone(Outsiders) thinks on offense.

If you try and cheat up to gain an edge against our run game, our TEs are going to torch you all game. If you give Lamar too much space, he'll steal 1st downs with 7,8,9,10+ yard gains all game. 

I'm not saying we're going to be some juggernaut on offense, but I think we've assembled some pieces that will demand respect. If Lamar takes even a small step forward in Year 2, I think we have a contender on our hands. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our running game holds this element as well(Referring to embedded tweet below). The Top 5 Success Rates for HBs in 2018- 1. Gus Edwards 2. Alvin Kamara 3. Mark Ingram 4. Todd Gurley 5. Christian McCaffrey  https://www.footballoutsiders.com/stats/rb

I think some of Jackson's Rookie woes(fumbles, scratch/? plays/throws) distract away from the machine like efficiency our offense flashed at times. The core is all there, and now we've added another element to compliment.

Efficiency Core- 1. Lamar Jackson 2. Gus Edwards 3. Mark Ingram 4. Willie Snead 5. Mark Andrews 6. Hayden Hurst 

Lamar opens up the running game, simplifies the passing the game, and can churn out conversions with his dynamic mobility. We owe a large measure of our efficiency to his layered impact. Gus Edwards doesn't go backwards, he's a North-South runner that had like what 1 negative run all year with a So-So OL. I expect Mark Ingram to carry his NO's reliability over to the Ravens, he's another runner that just doesn't fail. Willie Snead, Mark Andrews, and Hayden Hurst don't drop passes. They get open and then they catch the ball- simple. They gel with Lamar's strengths as a passer, and exploit the weaknesses of a defense committing itself to stopping Jackson's legs from killing them. 

*Jackson and Edwards had some administrative shortcomings, but both still bled efficiency into our offense.

Now for what we added to balance out the offense and compliment that Efficient Core:

Explosive Core- (New Additions) 1. Marquise Brown 2. Justice Hill (Hold Overs) 3. Lamar Jackson 4. Mark Andrews 

I don't think it's a hot or controversial take to say that Mark and Lamar are the only "explosive" players left from our 2018 campaign. John Brown had his moments but he's gone, and has been replaced with a much better weapon. Our 1st Round Pick, Marquise Brown. Also added was Justice Hill, an electric back with the full package. Last year we could gut punch teams to death, and occasionally we'd sneak in a big play here and there. Now though, we have some more exotic weaponry. Brown creates quick and effortless separation, takes the top off a defense, opens up space for our other pieces, is a YAC fiend with the ability to take any pass to the house, demands special defensive attention, his impact can't be understated. Hill perfectly compliments our stable of "Power" backs. Savage jump cut, educated stiff arm, underrated contact balance, and the speed to score from anywhere.

Lamar and Mark are clearly unique/special players, in that they demand a spot on both designated cores. Lamar had more explosive runs than our backs last year, and he's the most dynamic player at his position in the league. With legit monsters like Kittle hanging around, Andrews can't claim the same. He's an easy projection to the future Top 5 TE rankings though. He gets open frequently, often deep, and has blazing speed for a pass catcher his size..

 

Up In The Air- 1Chris Moore 2. Jordan Lasley 3. De'Lance Turner 4. Kenneth Dixon 5. Miles Boykin

These 5 have the potential to go in one or both of the categories. They either haven't established themselves fully or lack an uncomplicated path to production.

 

It's been a long time since we've assembled this kind of versatility on offense. Mismatch pieces, Grind pieces, Elite trait pieces, Playmaker pieces. This puzzle isn't looking too bad. You've gotta love the blend we've cooked into the offense. We've got our dunks and our layups, but now we have some missile 3 pointers 6 pointers to launch too. Also I guess we can consider the "Boyle Screen Pass", the NBA's "long 2" in terms of efficiency :|.

BTW Justin Tucker > Steph Curry #TheReal3King

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

http://www.footballperspective.com/running-back-heat-maps-2018-season/

In the picture below, I’ve listed all running backs with at least 100 carries. I calculated how often each running back, on each carry, rushed for least 1 yard, at least 2 yards, at least 3 yards,… at least 10 yards, at least 15+ yards, and at least 20+ yards. I plotted that below, but to make the graph more user friendly, each cell shows often the RB gained at least X yards relative to league average for all RBs with 100+ carries. So for Barkley, he rushed for at least 1 yard on 77% of his carries; since the league average is 81%, I put a “-4%” in his cell rather than 77%.

When you review, note that blue shading is good (meaning a player gained yards at a higher clip than average) while red shading is bad.

heat-map-rb.png

 

Who stands out as being terrific on a consistent basis?

Aaron Jones was at +7% when it comes to picking up at least 4 yards, and really stood out at gaining 6 or more yards: he did that on 38% of rushes, compared to an average of 26% for all running backs in this data set. Baltimore’s Gus Edwards was exceptional at gaining positive yards: he was 10% above average at gaining 1+, 2+, 3+, 4+, and 5+ yards, in the Ravens remarkable running attack under Lamar Jackson.

Edited by DreamKid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^ Tremendous work and very well-done visualization.

So, am I correct in the interpretation that Barkley did not make positive yards on a consistent basis (relative to league average), but his YPC is buoyed by a significantly higher-than-average number of long runs?  The chart tops out at 20+, but there are probably some 75's in there that other RBs just don't have?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, sp6488 said:

So, am I correct in the interpretation that Barkley did not make positive yards on a consistent basis (relative to league average), but his YPC is buoyed by a significantly higher-than-average number of long runs?

Yes, and it's not surprising given the quality of the OL he was running behind.  Wayne Gallman was the only other player to get even 50 carries for the Giants last year and he averaged a paltry 3.4 YPC, so I'd imagine there'd be a hell of a lot more red if he was on that chart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, sp6488 said:

^^^ Tremendous work and very well-done visualization.

To clarify, the work was done by Chase Stuart. Just in case you're under the impression it was me. Sometimes directly copying Raven relevant material from articles can make that a point of confusion. I always include a link when it's someone else's work. I work in a creative field so it's important to me that the distinction is made. I'm with you though, the guy did a good job. 

12 hours ago, sp6488 said:

So, am I correct in the interpretation that Barkley did not make positive yards on a consistent basis (relative to league average), but his YPC is buoyed by a significantly higher-than-average number of long runs?  The chart tops out at 20+, but there are probably some 75's in there that other RBs just don't have?

Bingo, and Chase referenced this specifically in the full article you can access through the link.

-How about at least 10 yards? The Cowboys star gained 10 or more yards on 13% of his rushes; Barkley did it on 12% of his carries. How about 15+ yards? Elliott hit that mark on 8.2% of his carries, while the Giants start did it on 7.7% of his rushes. So how in the world did Barkley finish the season with a higher yards per carry average? Because Elliott rushed for 20+ yards on just 4% of his carries, while Barkley did it on 6% of his carries. More importantly, Elliott’s longest run was 41 yards, while Barkley had runs of 46, 50, 51, 52, 68, 68, and 78. That’s how, despite Elliott pretty much “winning” at each distance, he lost the YPC battle. Even if Elliott had big runs more often, Barkley’s big runs were really big runs.-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×