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2 hours ago, BobbyPhil1781 said:

Can't we apply this logic to those that have already been infected as well? This is what I suggested prior but didn't really get any responses. Maybe I'm not understanding the difference in how your body fights and infection vs being vaccinated for an infection?

Also, I'm glad I'm getting a pass for this year b/c I don't ever get a flu vaccine lol. My new client gave me the opportunity to get in line for my first shot on Tuesday. If this doesn't become an annual thing (fingers crossed), you'll have to get upset w/ me next year. Seeing Pfizer's data about how well one shot protects you is tempting to only get one but I won't (assuming I don't get Moderna's or J&J's [which is highly unlikely]).

Yes, I haven't seen anything out that that shows people who have been infected can spread COVID, and I'd expect exactly the same logic to apply. Granted, you also expect it for re-infection, and there have been a few documented cases. I'm just saying I would expect any transmission to be negligible. 

 

Also not exactly the same thing, but I think Fauci/the CDC are also not speculating at all on the new variants, when that could do a lot to instill public confidence or relief. While they're a much more real threat than vaccinated transmission, we have vaccines getting dosed right now that work against both of the major variants, and the specifics of the protein the vaccine targets is why. We should be confident that they'll get crushed. There might be a short spike in cases, but if we talked about them as a bump in the road that they are, the public fear level would be at least somewhat closer to what it warrants. Again, I understand the strategy, I just feel helpless as to what to do to prevent this from being a necessity in the first place.

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FDA panel unanimously recommends third Covid vaccine as J&J wins key vote in path to emergency use

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2021/02/26/johnson-and-johnson-covid-vaccine-fda-panel-recommends-emergency-use.html

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The head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, warned earlier Friday that the declines in Covid-19 cases reported in the U.S. since early January may now be flattening as variants continue to spread.

"Over the last few weeks, cases and hospital admissions in the United States have been coming down since early January and deaths have been declining in the past week," Walensky said during a White House news briefing. "But the latest data suggest that these declines may be stalling, potentially levelling off at still a very high number."

Scaling-up vaccinations could help blunt the impact of the highly contagious variants, Adam MacNeil, an epidemiologist at the CDC, said during a presentation Friday before the vote. He added that the U.S. "nowhere close" to herd immunity, but vaccinations could help in "moving us closer to filling the herd immunity gap."

 

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Somebody might give me an answer regarding these particular thoughts and any would be appreciated. Wishing to know if antibodies might be specifically linked with strain. This might give me a definite idea whether or not that it was a totally different viral strain which had infected me again. Doctor mentioned that getting infected once more sometimes means worse symptoms or results and with me this definitely did not happen. First time was mentioned it was a light exposure yet got fairly strong brunt of the coronavirus  physical symptoms. Guessing did he know because of the amount of antibodies made or whether it’s possible to measure exposure from the size of the virus or math somehow. Wondering about if there’s a prevalence of certain symptoms specifically with individual known strains. Furthermore might a person possibly get infected with the exact same strain once more after the first infection particularly though subsequent to immunity time period. Maybe there is a member who has any statistics about average immunity after being infected that’s specifically linked to strain types known available. Gives possible ideas for how long safe right now. Not allowed to personally have this vaccine.

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Not free:

Getting the vaccine will protect you from the coronavirus — and it may keep people around you healthier, too.

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Health experts say the coronavirus vaccines may do more than protect recipients from covid-19. Researchers say people who are vaccinated and still contract the virus may carry less of it and also shed less of it — meaning those whom they expose to it may not become as sick.

 

There isn’t a lot of evidence yet to support this hypothesis, but researchers say it is likely the case based largely on observations in animal studies, as well as some preliminary research in humans.  In one preprint, researchers examined saliva samples in patients with covid-19 and discovered that those with a higher viral load had more severe cases. So it’s reasonable to assume the reverse could be true — that a lower viral load could result in less severe cases — said Ben Neuman, a virologist at Texas A&M University. In another, researchers found a lower viral load in covid patients who had been vaccinated, allowing them to infer that people who contract the virus post-vaccination shed less of it than the placebo recipients. In Moderna’s trial study, there was some provisional evidence that the vaccine could prevent some asymptomatic cases. Another study showed the Pfizer vaccine significantly prevented spread in animals, according to the company’s chief executive.  The Israeli Health Ministry found that one week after being fully vaccinated, only 317 people out of 715,425 tested positive for the coronavirus. That suggests the vaccines are preventing some asymptomatic infection, but it was only a survey and not a rigorous study.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2021/02/27/covid-vaccine-viral-load/

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If we hit these numbers, assuming there are somewhere around 250 million eligible Americans, Pfizer account for 11%/month, Moderna would count for 8%/month, and J&J would be 8% in March, with a likely increase from there if they hit the 100M doses by June target.

Weeks, not months, IMO.

 

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6 hours ago, ramssuperbowl99 said:

 

If we hit these numbers, assuming there are somewhere around 250 million eligible Americans, Pfizer account for 11%/month, Moderna would count for 8%/month, and J&J would be 8% in March, with a likely increase from there if they hit the 100M doses by June target.

Weeks, not months, IMO.

 

I'm surprised there isn't more of a jump in vaccinations with the new administration

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Not wishing to be political. Did not include the link specifically given this purpose. Live within a large incorporated eastern city. The nearest of our counties is paying for Uber rides to vaccination facilities. Possibly this kind of smart attitude will be replicated everywhere.

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2 hours ago, TVScout said:

21 percent ought then be vaccinated now. That means all the first responders, medical personnel, and the elderly. Guessing some of the corporates, politicians and teachers snagged a vaccine too. Maybe all the rest of usual folk might get their vaccinations. I’m not medically allowed to get any muscular injections ever and the only exception made was my necessitated immunoglobulin rabies stick. Hoping there will be a reverse effect of the exponential manner in which this virus has spread. 

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1 hour ago, vikesfan89 said:

I'm surprised there isn't more of a jump in vaccinations with the new administration

I'm not sure the new administration is able to increase the production of the vaccines.   That falls on the companies themselves.  Still a supply related issue which is the individual companies. 

1.   Production of vaccine  
2.  Then allocation, and distribution to the states. 
3.  Then allocation and distribution to the local agencies (hospitals, county health departments, independent locations (pharmacies).   
4.  Then personnel to administer the vaccines.

 

The new administration can help with the step 1.  They can assist with the other steps, but that would take a few things, 1 of them being a stimulus package to help with steps 2-4

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