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zelbell

With the 10th pick, the Browns select OT Jedrick Wills

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, LETSGOBROWNIES said:

I know I’m probably going against the grain here, but I hope they don’t retire it.

Id prefer they save it for extraordinary players, like 55 at USC, 7 at LSU, 45 at tOSU etc.

id love to see it be tradition the browns starting Lt wears 73.

Ehhhh

 

It’s easier to do in college for a reason. You can consistently get those types of players in college. You can’t in the NFL. Even if you draft well.

Edited by candyman93

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the first 12 minutes is good so far, Joe Talks about Jed, he was number 1 on his  board by a long way. 

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48 minutes ago, Kiwibrown said:



the first 12 minutes is good so far, Joe Talks about Jed, he was number 1 on his  board by a long way. 

Yeah I’d recommend this is a watch 

Wills was the best tackle in the class I’m very happy we got him. We are fortunate 

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3 hours ago, Kiwibrown said:


the first 12 minutes is good so far, Joe Talks about Jed, he was number 1 on his  board by a long way. 

Great watch, but didn’t he just tweet a week ago he liked Becton as his top tackle?

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4 hours ago, LETSGOBROWNIES said:

Great watch, but didn’t he just tweet a week ago he liked Becton as his top tackle?

well he did list Becton and Wills as 1a and 1b

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On 4/26/2020 at 6:36 AM, LETSGOBROWNIES said:

Great watch, but didn’t he just tweet a week ago he liked Becton as his top tackle?

He said he thought Becton has the highest ceiling but had a few issues He needs to work on and Wills was ready to start day 1. 
 

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, brooks1957 said:

Oh course, I am old enough to still remember Walter Johnson sloshing around his old 71 jersey in the mud at Cleveland Municipal Stadium against the Steelers.

And oh of course, this updated version totally works. Jedrick will be clearing traffic on I-71 to Hopkins so Chubb and his gang can take off.

Edited by brooks1957

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On 4/24/2020 at 11:45 AM, ditchdigger said:

Coupla things.

1. Writer was wrong about his comment about feet defilade with the rusher and shoulders defilade with the LOS. It was not a mistake. It was an advanced technique. I am sure Brent Key taught it and Wills learned it... very well. It takes the outside away and if rusher does try to set up an inside move and allows the blocker to slam that inside door shut.

Wills does not have a single go-to technique in pass pro. He varies it, like a baseball pitcher with a plus fastball, curve, slider, and change. This is just one example. You can't just watch some footage and figure out how to beat Wills that day.

2. You should not worry about JW's height, and don't put too much stock in his arm length. At 34.25", his arm length is superior but microscopically. You should look at his wingspan of 83.5". Wirfs, for example only loses a quarter inch of arm length to Wills, but his wingspan is only 80.25". Becton has really long arms, but his wingspan is shockingly less than Wills' is. Frankly, losing 2" of height only improves his chance of winning the running game leverage battle. Arm length is by itself overrated cuz not only does the low man win on run blocking, but the inside arms man wins on pass pro/pass rush. But the wingspan is what matters in space, which is where the tackle lives.

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he looks great! Awesome body shape for a tackle too, he looks like a shock absorber. 

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On 4/26/2020 at 3:27 AM, Kiwibrown said:



the first 12 minutes is good so far, Joe Talks about Jed, he was number 1 on his  board by a long way. 

I'd like to elaborate three things Thomas said.

1. Recovery. To me, stopping a pass rusher is like riding a rodeo bronco. You keep you balance as long as you can. You keep the bronco frustrated as long as you can. Eventually the bronco/rusher throws you/gets past you. Or he gives up or the play ends. But in the main, a pass protector spends his time correcting his over-adjustment or under-adjustment of what the rusher is doing, and the more he corrects his balance the harder it is to keep it.  And it does not take much being out of position/balance for a good pass rusher to defeat you and be on his way toward the quarterback.

Wills has great recognition of where he is on the battle, and in real time. I don't think this is coachable. Whenever the rusher is starting to gain an advantage, Wills understands it and instantly pops out a hard punch that resets the situation. He's back in control of the rush when most (virtually all) college linemen don't know they were in trouble yet.

You don't see Alabama chip Wills' man with a back or tight end. They do that on the other side of the line. Wills has this. Tua just didn't drift away from Wills' side of the pocket, even when the rusher got really close. They had amazing confidence in Wills' ability to shut down one man and keep him shut down.

2. Ability to improve. I think if you are good at advanced technique it is a lot easier to learn and improve than if you need to learn the basics. You can make the small changes in weight distribution to gain power, in Joe's example. You can modify what you do, since your hands and feet are already in synch, without those changes leaving you a hot mess.

Most importantly, the game is already slow for you, and you can adjust to the faster NFL game. You can actually take the coaching points, because it is all not just a blur. And your coach won't have to just let you do what you can already do cuz he can't change it fast enough going into the season.

3. Muscle memory. Yeah, JW has played ROT his entire college career and high school. But he has played it differently every single year. Look at his snaps as a true freshman and they are different from true soph and they are very different from true junior. He doesn't have anything calcified yet. His game was still evolving. He really only has a single year under his belt of top tier OL play. So I don't see him having trouble adjusting to the other side of the line.

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28 minutes ago, Techbert said:

Muscle memory. Yeah, JW has played ROT his entire college career and high school. But he has played it differently every single year. Look at his snaps as a true freshman and they are different from true soph and they are very different from true junior. He doesn't have anything calcified yet. His game was still evolving. He really only has a single year under his belt of top tier OL play. So I don't see him having trouble adjusting to the other side of the line.

I think he can transition but it’s still going to be hard for him. Like you said he changed up his game every year which is good. But every thing was coming out of the right side. The foundation of everything was built from the right side. His base, his hips, and hands are use to the right side. Still going to be tough cause he has to reteach himself. Just the way he plays the game gives me confidence he can make that transition. He is not a guy who relys on pure athletic ability. Guys who have stellar technique and base their game around technique have the best chances to transition. We know he is a technician cause like you said he was always tinkering with his technique to make himself better. Guys like Wirfs who solely relied on theirs athletic ability, are the ones I don’t like to make moves from one side to the other as tackles. 

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