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I have my first shot scheduled for Thursday. My wife already had both doses, and both kind of kicked her butt. She was a symptomatic COVID case back in December though, so we were expecting that. We are pretty confident I somehow never got it, even from her, so I'm hoping these shots are easy. I plan on going into work for a relatively full day immediately after getting my shot; I'm hoping I really don't regret that decision.

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I woke up several times throughout the night, feeling a little better each time. I currently have a fever of 101.7, a small headache, and some body aches. I think the body aches are from the shaking. I honestly don’t feel too bad now and I wouldn’t have guessed that I have a fever. 

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1 hour ago, minutemancl said:

I have my first shot scheduled for Thursday. My wife already had both doses, and both kind of kicked her butt. She was a symptomatic COVID case back in December though, so we were expecting that. We are pretty confident I somehow never got it, even from her, so I'm hoping these shots are easy. I plan on going into work for a relatively full day immediately after getting my shot; I'm hoping I really don't regret that decision.

Supposedly women are more likely to report side effects as well. How much is actual biology versus social is anyone’s guess 🤷‍♂️
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/7139366002

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2 minutes ago, Xenos said:

Supposedly women are more likely to report side effects as well. How much is actual biology versus social is anyone’s guess 🤷‍♂️
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/amp/7139366002

That is very interesting. Both vaccinations, she went through what I've been calling a "COVID speed run". She had just about every symptom she had when she had COVID, but they all came and went over the period of just a few hours. She's got a higher pain tolerance than me, so I know she wasn't exaggerating.

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23 minutes ago, minutemancl said:

That is very interesting. Both vaccinations, she went through what I've been calling a "COVID speed run". She had just about every symptom she had when she had COVID, but they all came and went over the period of just a few hours. She's got a higher pain tolerance than me, so I know she wasn't exaggerating.

Glad she’s okay. My advice is just have Tylenol and vapor rub next to you that night just in case. Hopefully you won’t need them and can just sleep through most of it. I think you should be fine for the full work day. It’s shouldn’t hit until much later. Usually before you go to sleep.

Edited by Xenos
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Unfortunately not free:

Why covid arm and other post-vaccine rashes might actually be a ‘good thing’.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/covid-vaccine-rash-side-effect/2021/04/09/7517bad0-97bd-11eb-962b-78c1d8228819_story.html

 

Supplementals:

https://allergyresearch.massgeneral.org/

 

CoVPN 3006 – Prevent COVID U

Quote

The COVID-19 Prevention Network (CoVPN) is conducting a study at select university campuses across the country to learn whether the Moderna EUA COVID-19 vaccine stops the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 disease. Over about 5 months, 12,000 university students will get injections of the Moderna EUA COVID-19 vaccine to help us learn if vaccinated people can still be infected with SARS-CoV-2, and if they are able to spread the virus to other people. The answer to this question can have an important impact on how soon we can get back to school, work and life.

https://www.coronaviruspreventionnetwork.org/moderna-vaccine-university-study/

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My mom is almost 61, was diagnosed with cancer about 2 years ago, has been in remission for almost a year, and her oncologist told her not to get the vaccine. Is this real life?

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14 minutes ago, MWil23 said:

My mom is almost 61, was diagnosed with cancer about 2 years ago, has been in remission for almost a year, and her oncologist told her not to get the vaccine. Is this real life?

It depends. "Cancer" is really 100 different diseases with 100 different treatments. It depends on the type of cancer she had and how they treated it. IF her immune system is compromised, that nets one answer, if it is not compromised, that can yield a different answer. Blood cancers like leukemia are different than breast cancer for example. Type of vaccine can also play a role mRNA ( Pfizer/Moderna) vs attenuated virus. ( J&J)

Its worth asking "Why or why not ?" so you better understand the concerns from the oncologist.

 

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26 minutes ago, Shanedorf said:

It depends. "Cancer" is really 100 different diseases with 100 different treatments. It depends on the type of cancer she had and how they treated it. IF her immune system is compromised, that nets one answer, if it is not compromised, that can yield a different answer. Blood cancers like leukemia are different than breast cancer for example. Type of vaccine can also play a role mRNA ( Pfizer/Moderna) vs attenuated virus. ( J&J)

Its worth asking "Why or why not ?" so you better understand the concerns from the oncologist.

 

It is/was Stage 1 breast cancer. They used radiation (no chemo needed thankfully) to treat it, as well as surgically remove the spot (no mastectomy done). That's roughly the extent of my knowledge. 

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1 hour ago, MWil23 said:

My mom is almost 61, was diagnosed with cancer about 2 years ago, has been in remission for almost a year, and her oncologist told her not to get the vaccine. Is this real life?

Who knows. They may be afraid of the Covid antibodies turning on her, and not necessarily the vaccine itself.

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Thoughts on Regeneron being utilized as a shot now?

https://www.statnews.com/2021/04/12/regeneron-antibody-cocktail-covid-simple-injection/
 

Quote

And why do we need antibodies when there are already vaccines? Dan Barouch, the director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a key figure in the development of the J&J vaccine and another investigator in Regeneron’s study said that the approaches are “complementary.”

“As of now, there are still substantial numbers of people who are not fully vaccinated,” Barouch said. What’s more, some people, including those with compromised immune systems, might not generate enough antibodies one their own —– and could benefit from antibodies that are injected into their bodies.

 

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18 minutes ago, kingseanjohn said:

Still feeling like crap. Really hope this subsides soon. 

I am pulling for you and also praying I dont mimic you. 

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