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Leisher's 2021 Mock Draft #4. Making Mr. Rodgers happy.


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th?id=OVFT.u5DMZVEtTwXipljLHkJFxy&pid=News&w=256&h=158&c=14&rs=2&qlt=90    Let's go all in.     

 

Russ Ball works the phones during the 2016 NFL Draft at Lambeau Field in Green Bay.    Do your magic!

 

Cap Space as of this Mock, - $1.3m  (+$2.4m if you include the $3.7m 2020 rollover.)

Extensions:    

 

a close up of a person wearing a helmet: Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) warms up before playing the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field.  Aaron Rodgers  QB gets 1 extra year, cap saved $17m

 

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Davante Adams  WR, cap saved $9.4m

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Za'Darius Smith  Edge, cap saved $12.4m

Cap Space after extensions:  $41.2m

 

Packers Resigned:

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Bobby Tonyan  TE  1yr  $3.5m

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Jamaal Williams  RB  3yrs  $5m  60%  cap hit $4m

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Lane Taylor  G  1yr  $1m  100%  cap hit $1m

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Marcedes Lewis  TE  1yr  $2.5m  100%  cap hit $2.5m

Total cap hit with resigns:  $11m

Cap space after resigns:  $30.2m

 

Free Agents:

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Marvin Jones Jr.  WR  3yrs  $9m  70%  cap hit $6.75m

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Johnathan Hankins  DL  4yrs  $7m  60%  cap hit $4.9m

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Shelby Harris  DL  4yrs  $7m  60%  cap hit $4.9m

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Mike Hilton Slot CB  3yrs  $6m  60%  cap hit $4.5m

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Dre Kirkpatrick CB  2yrs  $2.5m  60%  cap hit $2m

Total cap used on FA's:  $$23.05m

Cap space after FA's:  $7.15m

Cuts after June 1st:

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Dean Lowry DE  cap saved $4.3m (Shelby Harris takes Lowry's position)

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Josh Jackson  CB  cap saved $1.3m

Cap saved:  $5.6m

Cap space after cuts:  $12.75m

2021 NFL Draft

#29.  Packers get a call from Bengals, offer picks #37 and #109 for #29.  They select DE  Carlos Basham Wake Forest.

#37.  

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Dillon Radunz  OL  North Dakota St.  (Your welcome Cannondale)

Relatively speaking, he plays with good overall athleticism with regards to body control and balance. In the run game, he is excellent. He has a nasty disposition as a run blocker and wants to maul you. He can improve his proficiency at getting on moving defenders at the second level, but there's nothing alarming in this regard. He remains upright and demonstrates instances of good lateral redirect agility. He has the frame to gain more mass and bulk, which should make him more effective.

 

#62.

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Kenneth Gainwell  RB  Memphis

 Gainwell has good vision, elusiveness, footwork, pass-catching ability, and a surprising amount of power given his build. Memphis featured him as both a runner and receiver and his pass-catching skills should be a big part of his role in the NFL. The Tigers got him involved in the screen game and from the slot, where he features good route-running skills, reliable hands, and creativity in space. 

#92.

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Baron Browning  ILB/OLB  Ohio St.

Baron Browning is an enticing prospect when accounting for his dynamic athletic profile and flashes of production via splash plays throughout the course of his career at Ohio State. Browning has all of the physical skills needed to be a standout starter at the pro game, but his irregular play across multiple spots in the linebacker group during his time in Columbus has left some irregularities and inconsistencies in his game. With that in mind, Browning finished his career with excellent play down the stretch with the Buckeyes and his role in coverage. Browning should shine in a familiar role at the pro level; illustrating the needed discipline in zone coverage drops and as a pressure player in blitz scenarios for a team looking to boost their mid-level defense.

 

#109.

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Seth Williams  WR  Auburn

He's got the prototypical size and skill set to be an “X” in the NFL. A natural hands-catcher with strong hands who rarely allows the ball to get into his frame, Williams rarely double-catches the football. He likely won't win against press coverage with foot quickness. However, when he learns to use his hands and excellent functional strength, he won't have an issue off the line of scrimmage. He's fearless when catching slants over the middle and is very good in contested catch situations. In the NFL, he will be a red zone nightmare for defenses in slant, fades, 50/50 balls, and back-shoulder situations. He will have no problems excelling on special teams if needed. He doesn’t have elite separation agility at the top of the route and likely won't win with quickness against man coverage in this way—he has some stiffness in his hips.

#135.

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Keith Taylor  CB/S  Washington

Keith Taylor has aligned primarily outside, but has also moved inside in dime situations (Oregon 2019) where Washington appeared to be playing “match.” In the run game, he is a willing tackler who uses his length to secure tackles. He has excellent tackling efficiency in space and receivers rarely get extra yardage while he is in coverage. In the passing game, he does a good job of using his length in press coverage. He will play a bail technique at times and will get caught looking in the backfield as a result. 

Ideal Role: Outside-only corner in sub-packages.

Scheme Fit: A scheme that uses primarily press-man or zone.

 

#142.

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Khyiris Tonga  DL  BYU

Khyiris Tonga aligned as an interior defensive lineman for the BYU defense—they will align sometimes in an odd front, where Tonga will align as the 0-tech. He excels as a run defender. When he plays with good pad level, he is extremely difficult to single block. He needs to become more consistent at disengaging quickly, but he does show the ability to get to the football. He is a player that would be described as “stronger than he is explosive” based on his movement skills. He uses a good bull rush to get home and uses his length to knock down passes when he cannot. 

#173.

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Darrick Forrest  S  Cincinnati

Darrick Forrest was a three-year starter for the Cincinnati defense, a unit I would categorize as disciplined and consistent across that span and Forrest was a big reason why. While Forrest may not have any true standout traits, he is consistently sound across the board. He is a smart processor that is urgent in pursuit and a strong tackler. He takes good angles to the football and is physical in everything he does. Forrest is always around the football and is a versatile defender. While I like him best as a split zone safety, he can serve as a post safety, in the box, and can play situationally in the slot. Forrest is sound in coverage and does well to anticipate routes. He’s also flashed the ability to make plays on the football, even with his back to the quarterback. It’s difficult to poke holes in Forrest’s game other than he isn’t elite in any one area, but he doesn’t feature any restrictive concerns. From day one, Forrest should be a core special teamer that has the skill set to develop into a reliable starter. 

#177.

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William Bradley-King  Edge  Baylor

He plays with an extremely patient approach and isn’t quick to overcommit on run concepts. He’s able to anticipate pullers well and meets them with force at the point of attack. Bradley-King uses violent shoulder throws and his length in order to provide a jolt through the body of incoming blockers. Sack production throughout his career has come off of true wins. His first step out of the blocks has plenty of juice and he has the athleticism to win the corner. He has a multitude of ways of how he can win at the point of attack. He's highly crafty as a pass rusher and shows lots of hand-to-hand creativity when rushing the passer. He's aggressive with swatting hands down and then proceeding into the next steps of his rush plans. As a run defender, he often gets fixated on his individual battle that he remains oblivious to contain responsibilities. Allowing runs to bounce outside, he gets caught often attacking the midline of offensive tackles instead of staying on the outside shoulder while remaining cautious of perimeter threats. His eyes can get caught looking elsewhere and it results in plays going for big gains to his side. Chasing or having an impact on plays outside of the box are inconsistent and he can appear a bit heavy-footed while in pursuit.

#212.

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Trey Hill  IOL  Georgia

Trey Hill played center for the Bulldogs' offense. He has started games aligning at guard as well. In the run game, he comes off the ball hard. He is heavy at the point of attack and plays with good natural leverage. As a result, he is hard to bull rush. Although he plays with very good power in a phone booth, his limited agility shows when he has to move and engage. This is at the second level with regards to run blocking, and also when he has to be reactive to games as a pass blocker. He’s somewhat heavy-footed and probably best suited at guard where he can focus on his run or pass blocking. 

Ideal Role: Swing interior OL.

218.

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Damar Hamlin  S  Pittsburgh

A four-year starter at Pittsburgh, Damar Hamlin enters the NFL with significant experience under his belt. As Hamlin’s career progressed, his role in the secondary continued to expand with plenty of opportunities to function as a deep safety, in the box, and from the slot. His ability to operate in a variety of roles while bringing a balanced skill set as a run and pass defender makes Hamlin an appealing prospect. Hamlin is a smart processor, is always around the football, is enthusiastic as a tackler, has good ball skills, and has good coverage awareness. In so many ways Hamlin has proven to be a reliable and consistent defender in college, but his skill set across the board is ordinary and his frame is lean. Lacking any standout traits, Hamlin is boringly consistent across the board.

#254.

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Grant Stuard  LB/ST  Houston

Houston linebacker Grant Stuard is a joy to watch on film. He is an elite competitor that plays a physical and aggressive brand of football. He is excellent at processing the run, triggering downhill, and hunting the football. He thrives in condensed spaces and he is relentless in pursuit. His motor is always cranked and he knows no other speed than full speed. The challenge with Stuard is that for as exciting as he is to watch at Houston flying around the field, his skill set is quite limited when forecasting him to the NFL. He is a modest athlete that lacks length. His range is limited and he doesn’t project well to playing in coverage or space in the NFL. With that in mind, his best chance to stick is to excel on special teams like he did in college and has 500 reps of experience doing so. Stuard can be a reserve linebacker that provides value in short-yardage packages and on special teams. 

Ideal RoleSpecial teams ace, short-yardage linebacker.

UDFA's:

photo of 2021 NFL Draft prospect MillsDavis.jpg  David Mills  QB  Stanford

photo of 2021 NFL Draft prospect SmithJames.jpg  James Smith  P  Cincinnati

Shaun Jolly  Shaun Jolly  CB  Appalachian St.

photo of 2021 NFL Draft prospect MoalaViane.jpg  Viane Moala  DL  Utah

photo of 2020 NFL Draft prospect PhilyorWhop.jpg  Whop Philyor  WR  Indiana

photo of 2020 NFL Draft prospect DavidsonZach.jpg  Zach Davidson  TE  Central Missouri St.

photo of 2021 NFL Draft prospect GreenCarson.jpg  Carson Green  G  Texas A&M

photo of 2020 NFL Draft prospect AndersonOtis.jpg  Otis Anderson  RB/RS  UCF

Free Agent:

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Adam Humphries  WR  1yr  $3m

Final Cap Space:  $9.75m

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I don't understand how some of that cap wizardry would work.

 

But I do really like Kenneth Gainwell.  I think he gives a very good compliment to AJ Dillon, and can also be utilized like Tyler Ervin has been used in the offense, and will be a relatively cheap investment for a few years on a rookie scale.  

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You make really excellent free agent signings; your decisions and insights into cap spending decisions is impressive, and your knowledge of even late round players' abilities and fits for the Packers makes my head spin. Damn good mock. Congrats!

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12 hours ago, smetana34 said:

Only question is why cut Lowery if we have no use for his money. If all we're doing is rolling the money over to next year, I'd rather hang on to him

I'm there too simply because his skill set is different from the two IDL you're bringing in as well as the IDL you drafted.

I'd be thrilled if we could pull off that trade you have at the beginning; especially if Radunz is there at 37. I think you can get Gainwell in the 3rd and Browning may fall due to some of what you read here:

https://thedraftnetwork.com/articles/baron-browning-2021-nfl-draft-skill-set

I'm not opposed to Browning, but does he fit an odd front and how would he be used? Sounds like he wants to play in a scheme like Minnesota's or Carolina's. Plus, he's probably not going to be there in the 3rd(TDN has him as a top-20 prospect). You may want to swap him and Gainwell around.

Really like the Keith Taylor pick; reminds me a lot of Micah Hyde - not a world beater, but can be a versatile chess piece in the secondary and can get you a turnover or two. Tonga also gives us that mound-in-the-middle to allow Kenny to rush more often. Lots of value picks in this draft on Day 3 and I like your UDFA and late summer FA selections.

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I like the draft.  

Little confused regarding the DL.  Cut Lowry.  Sign two guys in free agency, draft another run stopper in the draft.  Add Clark and Keke to the mix and that is too many DL.  I'd say take one or the other in free agency.

I like the Jones (WR) pickup.  

Got a good slot corner, meh on Kirkpatrick.  

I'm going to be a fan of any mock that us trading down.  Then preferably trading back up for a corner or WR.

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41 minutes ago, vegas492 said:

I like the draft.  

Little confused regarding the DL.  Cut Lowry.  Sign two guys in free agency, draft another run stopper in the draft.  Add Clark and Keke to the mix and that is too many DL.  I'd say take one or the other in free agency.

I like the Jones (WR) pickup.  

Got a good slot corner, meh on Kirkpatrick.  

I'm going to be a fan of any mock that us trading down.  Then preferably trading back up for a corner or WR.

If I have your math correct, 5 guys is not too many guys; especially when we don't know how Joe Barry will be using our IDL FWIW.

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5 minutes ago, Joe said:

If I have your math correct, 5 guys is not too many guys; especially when we don't know how Joe Barry will be using our IDL FWIW.

Our nickel is our base.  That isn't going to change.  You aren't trotting out three run stoppers and Clark on the DL.  Or two run stoppers and Clark.

It's too many of the same body.  One too many for sure.  Maybe even two.  

If it were me, I'd get rid of Hankins.  Shelby Harris, to me, is a better all around player.  Keep the drafted kid.  DL of Clark, Harris, Keke and Tonga should do it.  If you really want another body, draft one late or bring back Lancaster/Snacks at a fraction of the price.

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Where do I start with this fantasy:

1. Restructures you don't say what and for how long so I have no comments. Very poor on your part.

2. Packers signing Tonyan for just 1 year is about as dumb as I can think of. This needs to be 3 years plus. 

3. Packers resiigned Jones so Williams is gone. Not you fault I'm surprised to but happy. 

4. I laughed at Marvin Jones for 3 mil a year unless you meant 9 mil a year which is too much,. Hankins is a blob and Harris may make close to 7 mil per year not 4 yrs for 7 mil. Welcome to NFL reality.

5. Since Jones is signed replace Gainwell with a CB or WR. Adam Humphries would be a great get. 

My biggest comment is the contracts you list. I guess we will see soon enough but you are way way off IMO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, vegas492 said:

Our nickel is our base.  That isn't going to change.  You aren't trotting out three run stoppers and Clark on the DL.  Or two run stoppers and Clark.

It's too many of the same body.  One too many for sure.  Maybe even two.  

If it were me, I'd get rid of Hankins.  Shelby Harris, to me, is a better all around player.  Keep the drafted kid.  DL of Clark, Harris, Keke and Tonga should do it.  If you really want another body, draft one late or bring back Lancaster/Snacks at a fraction of the price.

Yeah, I realized that after I looked back a second time and thought Hankins was a bit of a waste TBH.

I'd still have at least 6 IDL regardless of our base. We have two divisional teams with excellent RB's and they typically like to run the ball, we're playing run-first teams in Baltimore, San Fran, Cleveland, Cincy, New Orleans, and the Rams; all of which have very strong RB's. That's 10 of our 16 games... 😬 Ergo, I'd bring Snacks back and sign Harris to a short-term deal, but draft someone like Barmore early, then draft Tonga(or Bobby Brown, who I prefer TBH) as their eventual replacements....that is if you're cutting Lowry.

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