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Matt Lafleur's Offense


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from The Athletic

"Wide receivers coach Jason Vrable said Valdes-Scantling has grown most not specifically in his short route running, but in his releases that set up those routes. Instead of trying to beat a defensive back immediately upon the snap, Valdes-Scantling is better setting up defensive backs such as Jaire Alexander to follow him one way off his release before darting into an open window. Before, Valdes-Scantling might’ve just tried to run faster than his opponent to that open window right after the snap. That allows for better spacing in the offense, which Vrable said is crucial for Rodgers and something Adams understands at an elite level."

“(Valdes-Scantling) has a lot of traits, but you can’t just run into a window as fast as you can,” Vrable said. “There’s also a linebacker right next to him, so to understand how to widen a guy and hold windows … the maturity of him is understanding, ‘It ain’t just about me, it’s about being open for 12 at the right time.’ So like I said, his training camp, if you were watching the tape, I think he’s like 80 percent completion right now against live reps, so he’s completing balls deep, short, across the field."

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SI on Lazard and his role in MLF's offense

https://www.si.com/nfl/packers/news/packers-swoon-over-goon-lazard

“In our system, we typically have Davante over there on the left side, a lot of times by himself to do 1-on-1s,” receivers coach Jason Vrable explained on Sunday. “Well, the receiver over there opposite is usually by the tight end. A lot of times, you have the running game, safeties get down over the top of the tight end. You’ve got to make, I always call it a conscious decision. If there’s a guy 5 yards over the top of me who’s barrelling down full speed, there’s some guys in this league who turn that thing down. And I can’t find many times on tape over the three-year period where he wasn’t going to try and take that guy and manhandle him and win his 1-on-1s.

And it’s usually a collision – and it’s sometimes a violent one – where I feel like that guy doesn’t blink. Literally, he stares at the guy, looks him in the eye and goes in and puts his hands in his shoulder pads, and he’s coming back for more the next play.

“It’s almost a hybrid fullback on some of our plays because you have to block that guy. He’s at the point of attack. That guy’s trying to get the ball-carrier and you’re standing between him for your teammate. To do that and also run go’s the next play, it takes a special character guy.
I think he fits that mold of what we need in our offense to be successful.”

In ProFootballFocus.com’s run-blocking grades, Lazard ranked third among receivers last year.

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From Acme Packing Co

Matt LaFleur's Offense

The Packers finished last season first in EPA-per-play, first in offensive DVOA, first in EPA-per-dropback, first in passing DVOA, fourth in EPA-per-rush, and fifth in rushing DVOA. The unit was amazing in almost every way. Their offensive line lapped the field in pass block win-rate and finished fifth in Football Outsiders’ adjusted line yards, which attempts to quantify a unit’s run blocking.

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From the San Diego Union
Article on why Staley wanted Corey Linsley so bad

"The Rams finished the 2020 regular season ranked first in the NFL in points and yards allowed. They also led the league in interceptions and fewest touchdown passes permitted. In their first playoff game, the Rams went to Seattle and limited Russell Wilson to 11 completions for 174 yards. They sacked the often-elusive quarterback five times in a 30-20 victory.

To understand why Corey Linsley is now a Charger, consider what he and the Packers did to Staley’s defense the next week.
Green Bay amassed 484 total yards, including 188 on the ground, and surrendered zero sacks.

Staley was so impressed that, two months later and now the Chargers’ head coach, he convinced his new bosses to offer Linsley what was then the biggest contract for a center in league history.

There was one team that blocked us all year and that was them,” Staley said of the Packers."

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27 minutes ago, Shanedorf said:

SI on Lazard and his role in MLF's offense

https://www.si.com/nfl/packers/news/packers-swoon-over-goon-lazard

“In our system, we typically have Davante over there on the left side, a lot of times by himself to do 1-on-1s,” receivers coach Jason Vrable explained on Sunday. “Well, the receiver over there opposite is usually by the tight end. A lot of times, you have the running game, safeties get down over the top of the tight end. You’ve got to make, I always call it a conscious decision. If there’s a guy 5 yards over the top of me who’s barrelling down full speed, there’s some guys in this league who turn that thing down. And I can’t find many times on tape over the three-year period where he wasn’t going to try and take that guy and manhandle him and win his 1-on-1s.

And it’s usually a collision – and it’s sometimes a violent one – where I feel like that guy doesn’t blink. Literally, he stares at the guy, looks him in the eye and goes in and puts his hands in his shoulder pads, and he’s coming back for more the next play.

“It’s almost a hybrid fullback on some of our plays because you have to block that guy. He’s at the point of attack. That guy’s trying to get the ball-carrier and you’re standing between him for your teammate. To do that and also run go’s the next play, it takes a special character guy.
I think he fits that mold of what we need in our offense to be successful.”

In ProFootballFocus.com’s run-blocking grades, Lazard ranked third among receivers last year.

There were SIGNIFICANT drives last year where Lazard's blocking led to Massive game changing plays. (For obvious reasons re-watched the Saints game). Lazard is a definite plus on multiple kinds of plays, but we wouldn't have beat the Saints last year without him. Got us huge momentum changes, and out of a few long third down problems. His blocking ability opens the offence up more than say Tonyan's or Sternberger's. Stats lie with that guy, because having him in the slot is gonna keep Cobb on the bench until third down.  

Edited by oldmansmell
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13 hours ago, incognito_man said:

I feel very confident he's going to either 

(1) Price himself well outside of our range as our #2 or

(2) Price himself well within our range to extend him and not Davante

 

 

If 1 happens we’re again right there at the end. If 2 happens my respect for Gutenkunst drops from probable to questionable. No thanks.

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56 minutes ago, ChaRisMa said:

If 1 happens we’re again right there at the end. If 2 happens my respect for Gutenkunst drops from probable to questionable. No thanks.

If MVS turns into a #1 WR you will lose respect for Gute?

I'm very confused.

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from SI

"LaFleur’s teams start fast.
Last season, the Packers led the NFL with opening-drive scores and 73 opening-drive points.

Incredibly, Rodgers threw nine touchdown passes on opening possessions.
 

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In this thread, we've talked a bit about the use of 12 personnel by MLF and here's an article talking about 3 reasons why coaches choose it
(Diagrams and details in the article)

http://noceilingsfootball.com/3-reasons-12-personnel-formations-might-hardest-defend/
 

1) Run gaps vs vertical threat balance
2) Motions, trades, unbalanced- dictated strength
3) Flexibility

"In any personnel grouping, it takes the right players and detailed coaching to be able to do what you want to do successfully. We did not even get into specific types of offenses and plays, but many systems could thrive and execute their concepts in the formations described above.

In coaching the game and researching different schemes and philosophies, I have come across multiple great ideas on both sides of the ball. 12 personnel offenses embody many of the things that I would find difficult to defend in today’s game, and this article only merely scratched the surface. It takes the right combination of talent within their team to execute effectively, but 12 personnel formations provide an offensive coordinator with a tremendous amount of opportunities for innovation and creativity to execute against any type of defense"

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Article from SI on MLF's right hand man- Nathaniel Hackett

https://www.si.com/nfl/2021/09/16/nathaniel-hackett-journey-from-doctor-to-dancer-to-top-head-coaching-candidate-daily-cover

"Green Bay’s offense often unfolds like a Netflix miniseries. There is a story to each gameplan but there are subplots; the development of a play for Lewis or some Rodgers bomb that will land in the hands of a receiver miles beyond the back end of a defense and jar the audience from a power nap induced by stretch-run plays. Hackett, in his role, is like the fixer. He is plotting and tracking the development of all these miniature powder kegs that will explode when the opponent is most vulnerable. His experience as a young coach hardwired in the West Coast offense was instrumental in getting Rodgers on board with an outside-zone system that can sometimes feel predetermined and stale to control-obsessed passers used to having the offense fit their various whims. His presence added a personality and heft to one of the most popular and copied schemes in football, helping Green Bay stand on its own amid a field of imitators. "

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On 9/16/2021 at 1:05 PM, Shanedorf said:

Article from SI on MLF's right hand man- Nathaniel Hackett

https://www.si.com/nfl/2021/09/16/nathaniel-hackett-journey-from-doctor-to-dancer-to-top-head-coaching-candidate-daily-cover

"Green Bay’s offense often unfolds like a Netflix miniseries. There is a story to each gameplan but there are subplots; the development of a play for Lewis or some Rodgers bomb that will land in the hands of a receiver miles beyond the back end of a defense and jar the audience from a power nap induced by stretch-run plays. Hackett, in his role, is like the fixer. He is plotting and tracking the development of all these miniature powder kegs that will explode when the opponent is most vulnerable. His experience as a young coach hardwired in the West Coast offense was instrumental in getting Rodgers on board with an outside-zone system that can sometimes feel predetermined and stale to control-obsessed passers used to having the offense fit their various whims. His presence added a personality and heft to one of the most popular and copied schemes in football, helping Green Bay stand on its own amid a field of imitators. "

This is what I was worried about as in OP. But I think Rodgers having won an MVP last year pretty much means he's as big of a believer as anyone. If he's had anyone to point the finger at for the last two NFC Championships its himself. So whatever flew into his man bun it isn't the offensive scheme. Also nice that Hackett is on the same page as me. You need to improve your guard play Nathaniel! Get it together!

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5 hours ago, Les Punting said:

Here's a nice video breakdown from Alex Rollins on how the offensive problems in Week 1 were mostly on LaFluer being outcoached.

Saints vs. Packers

You mean it wasn't a 20 second video saying "Rodgers blows and everything is his fault."  GASP

I guess this guy with all his facts, common sense, and the All-22 is nothing but a hero worshipper

Edited by cannondale
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