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1 minute ago, cannondale said:

What is Chubb worth to the Packers since his contract is up after next year ?? Not much IMO. 

😂

Rodgers contract is up after next year too. Just an FYI. Neither of those guys gets moved without extensions in place by the acquiring team. 

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1 hour ago, Old Guy said:

😂

Rodgers contract is up after next year too. Just an FYI. Neither of those guys gets moved without extensions in place by the acquiring team. 

The Packers aren't winning anything next year. Sign Chubb in 2023 if that's a guy you target. The timeline and value per trade is the issue for me. You can get a $25m per year Edge any time. Why trade for one ? 🤣 🙄

A. First Round pick (via trade) and sign an Edge in FA in 2023 for $25m

B. Chubb (via trade) and sign him for $25m in 2022

You choose Option B. I choose Option A.

Edited by cannondale
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Doug Farrar   No matter how great a quarterback may be, every one of them has his own personal Kryptonite. For Tom Brady, it’s always been pressure right up the middle. For Aaron Rodgers, at least in 2020, it was coverage in which he faced two deep safeties. This trend not only affected Rodgers’ efficiency and explosiveness; it also drastically affected his best receiver — and perhaps the best receiver in the NFL today. Per Sports Info Solutions, when presented with single-high coverage in 2020 (Cover-1, Cover-3), Davante Adams caught 81 of 99 targets for 971 yards, 574 air yards, a league-high 13 touchdowns, and a receiver rating of 139.8. Against any manner of two-safety coverage (Cover-2, 2-Man, Cover-4, Cover-6, Tampa-2), Adams caught 28 of 42 targets for 335 yards, 238 air yards, two touchdowns, and a receiver rating of 86.9.

The two-deep conundrum obviously started with Rodgers. Against single-safety coverage last season, Rodgers completed 205 of 299 yards for 2,496 yards, 1,346 air yards, 29 touchdowns, two interceptions, an Adjusted Net Yards per Attempt of 9.3, and a passer rating of 123.5.

Against two-high coverage, he completed 121 of 188 passes for 1,734 yards, 1,035 air yards, nine touchdowns, four interceptions, an Adjusted Net Yards per Attempt of 8.2, and a passer rating of 101.2.

So, that was the crucible Rodgers faced heading into the 2021 season. If you cover him single-high, he’ll destroy your day. If you counter with two-high, you at least have a chance. And if you can stop the Packers from running the ball effectively against two-high, you have more than a chance.

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5 minutes ago, Leader said:

Doug Farrar   No matter how great a quarterback may be, every one of them has his own personal Kryptonite. For Tom Brady, it’s always been pressure right up the middle. For Aaron Rodgers, at least in 2020, it was coverage in which he faced two deep safeties. This trend not only affected Rodgers’ efficiency and explosiveness; it also drastically affected his best receiver — and perhaps the best receiver in the NFL today. Per Sports Info Solutions, when presented with single-high coverage in 2020 (Cover-1, Cover-3), Davante Adams caught 81 of 99 targets for 971 yards, 574 air yards, a league-high 13 touchdowns, and a receiver rating of 139.8. Against any manner of two-safety coverage (Cover-2, 2-Man, Cover-4, Cover-6, Tampa-2), Adams caught 28 of 42 targets for 335 yards, 238 air yards, two touchdowns, and a receiver rating of 86.9.

The two-deep conundrum obviously started with Rodgers. Against single-safety coverage last season, Rodgers completed 205 of 299 yards for 2,496 yards, 1,346 air yards, 29 touchdowns, two interceptions, an Adjusted Net Yards per Attempt of 9.3, and a passer rating of 123.5.

Against two-high coverage, he completed 121 of 188 passes for 1,734 yards, 1,035 air yards, nine touchdowns, four interceptions, an Adjusted Net Yards per Attempt of 8.2, and a passer rating of 101.2.

So, that was the crucible Rodgers faced heading into the 2021 season. If you cover him single-high, he’ll destroy your day. If you counter with two-high, you at least have a chance. And if you can stop the Packers from running the ball effectively against two-high, you have more than a chance.

Summary:

"If you defend the run well and the pass well, you defend well overall and teams (QBs) won't do as well against good defense as they do against bad defense."

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4 minutes ago, incognito_man said:

"If you defend the run well and the pass well, you defend well overall and teams (QBs) won't do as well against good defense as they do against bad defense."

You needed at least one more "well" to make that statement work :)

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Matt Schneidman -   I caught up with Jamaal Williams, a Packers fan favorite the last four years who returns to Green Bay Monday night as the Lions RB.

On his pregame plans, a potential Lambeau Leap & more: “I feel like I’m still well-loved enough not to get messed with.”

///

Have opposing players taken Lambeau Leaps?

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2 hours ago, Leader said:

Matt Schneidman -   I caught up with Jamaal Williams, a Packers fan favorite the last four years who returns to Green Bay Monday night as the Lions RB.

On his pregame plans, a potential Lambeau Leap & more: “I feel like I’m still well-loved enough not to get messed with.”

///

Have opposing players taken Lambeau Leaps?

OchoCinco did, and was welcomed.  Fred Smoot tried and was shoved out.  I think someone else on the Vikings did it.

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Ross Uglem / Packer Report -     The Packers certainly did draft Eric Stokes in the first round.  They also drafted a nickel corner I really like in the mid-rounds in Shemar Jean-Charles.

Yet, just a handful of months after those two cornerbacks had their pants pulled down by an NFC South opponent in a big spot, here were Kevin King and Chandon Sullivan, starting again, giving up five receptions on just five targets for 99 yards and two touchdowns.  I don't even have to do the calculation to tell you that's going to be a perfect passer rating of 158.3.  

Yes, they drafted a corner with their first selection.  There was still no reason for either Kevin King or Chandon Sullivan to be on the Packers roster in 2021.  After a nice year as the Packers dime corner in 2019, Sullivan was exposed over the course of nearly 550 coverage snaps in 2020.  He allowed 65% of the passes thrown into his coverage to be completed for an average of 11.8 yards per catch.  He broke up just four passes and caught one interception on 77 targets and gave up two touchdowns.  As much as he struggled during the regular season, he was worse in the playoffs. 

Kevin King's pass-rating against when targeted a season ago was north of 115 and ranked 73rd of the 90 NFL cornerbacks that played at least 500 snaps.  Whatever athletic profile existed when the Packers drafted King appears to have been lessened considerably by injury, as King is routinely beaten over the top, despite being 6'3" tall.  

The Packers did assign one key resource (a 1st round pick in the late 20s) to cornerback, but bid against themselves to pay Kevin King $5 million this season and had no need to retain Sullivan.  On top of that, they certainly had no need to play them a combined 91 snaps against the Saints.

-  Unfortunately for Green Bay, the decision to address the defensive line only in the way of 5th round pick TJ Slaton and UDFA Jack Heflin doesn't appear to be working.  It certainly won't work when Heflin sits in favor of an ineffective Tyler Lancaster and Slaton only sees 16 snaps. 

Green Bay felt the need to add Snacks Harrison off the street in the middle of a playoff run a season ago.  The decision to stand virtually pat at that position is a troubling one.  Dean Lowry was largely ineffective in 2020, yet he was retained despite potential cap savings.  Kingsley Keke missed significant time during the offseason, and even if he hadn't, is best used as an interior pass-rush specialist who occasionally pitches in against the run.  

- Ultimately, I believe the offense will be fine.  They'll specifically be fine when they find a way to swap Lucas Patrick for David Bakhtiari on the offensive line.  Rodgers will snap back into form at some point (hopefully) and last year's #1 offense with a bullet will at least find a way to finish the season in the top five.  They'll be good enough on that side of the ball, if they get healthy-ish and stay healthy-ish to win a championship. I'm not sure they can actually fix any of the above.

 

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36 minutes ago, Leader said:

Matt Schneidman -  Packers practice squad protections this week: QB Kurt Benkert, K J.J. Molson and LS Steven Wirtel.

Is there a limit on how many times a player can be protected on the PS?  If not, this might be the list all year long...or at least until they decided to elevate the LS.

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31 minutes ago, Smidgeon said:

Is there a limit on how many times a player can be protected on the PS?  If not, this might be the list all year long...or at least until they decided to elevate the LS.

I dont know if there's a limit - but suspect not - as comments online indicate (as you have....) that this trio or players will be protected continually.

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