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I've now officially replaced all the plumbing in our house. It took four years but toilets, bathtubs, and sinks have all needed replaced at various times. And I've had the joy of doing it.

After replacing everything under the kitchen sink today, the kid locked the bathroom door and closed it. Girlfriend took off the doorknob for some reason. So I had to use a credit card to open the door. Then one of the screws for the doorknob fell into the u bend in the bathroom sink. So I had to take that apart to get the screw and put the doorknob back on. Then I got to put the u bend back together.

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On 2/19/2020 at 10:08 AM, vike daddy said:

can be difficult to handle, and expensive. but very well built.

 

much like @ET80's wife.

The M12s are nice and small, easy to handle. Still have plenty of power for most home owners projects. I'm a fan. 

Heck my 6 year used the impact drill last weekend. 

They are expensive though. 

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Not sure if this is the right thread, but I have an old old old heavy af dresser from like the 60's-70's that I was forced to take when a relative passed away.

Which is fine, I appreciate it and all but it's kind of ugly and I want to "update" it with paint and new uh, knobs or whatever. Also one of the drawers is stuck closed so I need to investigate that.

Having 0 experience doing this, how easy or hard would this be? I'd just be sanding it down and painting / sealing it basically. Anyone have DIY experience with that kind of stuff?

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5 minutes ago, skywindO2 said:

I'm interested in doing this in my kitchen and bathroom. Much smaller space than 1500sq feet since my condo is only 950. Let me know how it goes! 

Will do! I've never done it before, but a couple of my buddies have and think it's a great route. We are doing a floating floor, so that first strip is pretty critical. I'm hoping it lasts us a good 15 years or so.

I'm putting it in our bathrooms as well, so that's why the extra square footage.

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2 hours ago, Fl0nkerton said:

Not sure if this is the right thread, but I have an old old old heavy af dresser from like the 60's-70's that I was forced to take when a relative passed away.

Which is fine, I appreciate it and all but it's kind of ugly and I want to "update" it with paint and new uh, knobs or whatever. Also one of the drawers is stuck closed so I need to investigate that.

Having 0 experience doing this, how easy or hard would this be? I'd just be sanding it down and painting / sealing it basically. Anyone have DIY experience with that kind of stuff?

Yeah, some.

Is it solid wood, or veneered?  

If solid wood, sanding it down and giving a nice new coat of wood finish will really give it new life.  But it will also take a loooooonnnnnnnggggg time.  Sanding is one of those tedious activities that you better buckle up for.  Because you'll have to start at low grits and work you way to the higher ones.  Suggest you invest in some nice power sanders to get the job done.  Both a hand sander, and maybe a dremel with sanding attachments for hard to reach areas.

If it's veneered, i wouldn't sand it.  I once revitalized an old veneered vanity by painting the lower portion, and putting a new hardwood top on.  Gave it a two toned look.  You ability to do that will depend on whether the veneer has worn through, if there are curves that will be difficult to work around, etc.  

Replacing the pulls is easy.  Just match the hole sizes if you don't want to redrill holes.  Hopefully they're single holes so you don't have to worry about matching the distance between penetrations.

The stuck drawer could be a lot of things...but i'd pull out the rest of the drawings so you can see inside.  Maybe something is hanging it up. 

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38 minutes ago, theJ said:

Yeah, some.

Is it solid wood, or veneered?  

If solid wood, sanding it down and giving a nice new coat of wood finish will really give it new life.  But it will also take a loooooonnnnnnnggggg time.  Sanding is one of those tedious activities that you better buckle up for.  Because you'll have to start at low grits and work you way to the higher ones.  Suggest you invest in some nice power sanders to get the job done.  Both a hand sander, and maybe a dremel with sanding attachments for hard to reach areas.

If it's veneered, i wouldn't sand it.  I once revitalized an old veneered vanity by painting the lower portion, and putting a new hardwood top on.  Gave it a two toned look.  You ability to do that will depend on whether the veneer has worn through, if there are curves that will be difficult to work around, etc.  

Replacing the pulls is easy.  Just match the hole sizes if you don't want to redrill holes.  Hopefully they're single holes so you don't have to worry about matching the distance between penetrations.

The stuck drawer could be a lot of things...but i'd pull out the rest of the drawings so you can see inside.  Maybe something is hanging it up. 

Cool. I'm pretty sure it's solid wood. Already asked my pops for an orbital sander.

From what I read, you sand and sand until you think you're done and then sand it some more lol

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2 minutes ago, Fl0nkerton said:

Cool. I'm pretty sure it's solid wood. Already asked my pops for an orbital sander.

From what I read, you sand and sand until you think you're done and then sand it some more lol

Pretty much.

If you're at all unsure whether it's solid/veneer, look at the seams and joints.  If it's solid wood, you'll see the grain wrap around.  If it's veneer, it typically won't line up (unless they did a bang up job).  Real old furniture is usually solid though, so you're probably correct.

I"m a fan of natural wood, so i wouldn't do much more than give it a nice coat of finish after the sanding is done.  But if you're into paint, go for it.  Just make sure to seal it first so it coats evenly.  Or get a nice paint/primer in one.

Also make sure to get all the dust off before you paint or finish it.  Any dust left in the pores can also mess up the evenness of the coat.

Anything else you want to know, hit me up.  Also post before/after pictures!

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26 minutes ago, theJ said:

Pretty much.

If you're at all unsure whether it's solid/veneer, look at the seams and joints.  If it's solid wood, you'll see the grain wrap around.  If it's veneer, it typically won't line up (unless they did a bang up job).  Real old furniture is usually solid though, so you're probably correct.

I"m a fan of natural wood, so i wouldn't do much more than give it a nice coat of finish after the sanding is done.  But if you're into paint, go for it.  Just make sure to seal it first so it coats evenly.  Or get a nice paint/primer in one.

Also make sure to get all the dust off before you paint or finish it.  Any dust left in the pores can also mess up the evenness of the coat.

Anything else you want to know, hit me up.  Also post before/after pictures!

Right on! Yeah, will do.

My gf is skeptical I can pull it off, but I'm determined dammit lol

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1 hour ago, Fl0nkerton said:

From what I read, you sand and sand until you think you're done and then sand it some more lol

I know people who have gone the zip strip route ( kitchen cabinets) and were happy with the results. You put this paste on the wood and then it reacts with the paint/finish and it all comes off with a scraper. Then you'd do a final sanding and you're good to go. Its especially helpful if you've got multiple coats of paint on the dresser. Nasty chemicals, so wear protection.

Sanding alone may be the answer, just wanted to let you know there are other options

http://www.recochem.com/us/products/solvents_cleaners/zip_strip_premium_paint_finish_remover

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27 minutes ago, MWil23 said:

putting in an island

when our friends built their island they couldn't decide exactly where to place it in the kitchen. So they put it on felt feet and the whole thing slides depending on where they want it for parties or daily life. Workout out pretty slick

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