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4 minutes ago, theJ said:

You don't need fancy jigs to do most of the basic ones.  It can all be done with hand tools, obviously some it slowly.  My favorite joint to make with just the table saw and set of chisels is a mortise and tenon.  Takes some practice to get the mortise looking nice, but if you keep the mortise blind (and not a through-mortise), the laps on the tenon will cover any rough work.  Some people use a mortising jig.  I don't have one, and will probably never buy one.  It makes fast work of it, but not everything needs to be done fast.

EDIT: also, i mentioned i do the tenons on the table saw.  Those can be done with a hand saw too with some practice.  I don't generally, bc i'm bad at it and it makes the fitment frustrating.  Usually i'll do one that way to practice, the rest on the table saw.  Unless i'm pressed for time.

I think you overestimate my skills.  

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16 minutes ago, Outpost31 said:

I think you overestimate my skills.  

Lol.  We all start somewhere.  

I'd recommend buying a cheap set of chisels, and some nice measuring/marking tools first.  Precision of joinery comes from precision of measuring/marking.  

There is obviously skill in making a really nice joint, but a nice set of precision measuring tools will get you 60% of the way there.

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@Outpost31 @theJ those old school wood workers and the Amish are absolute artists. The finite and intricate details are just unbelievable.

Re: Joining

I love the Kreg and swear by it, albeit I know some love the no screws and wood glue. I just prefer the rustic look and feel of the fastened wood and for bigger projects, if I need to move them, I can always unscrew them. So, for my farmhouse table, if one of my 2x6 tabletop boards chips, I can remove the 8 pocket screws, get another board for $5, use the planer and sander to get it perfect, cut it to size, finish it, and fasten it instead of making a new tabletop. Bases are easy, but the tops take some precision and patience.

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2 hours ago, MWil23 said:

@Outpost31 @theJ those old school wood workers and the Amish are absolute artists. The finite and intricate details are just unbelievable.

Re: Joining

I love the Kreg and swear by it, albeit I know some love the no screws and wood glue. I just prefer the rustic look and feel of the fastened wood and for bigger projects, if I need to move them, I can always unscrew them. So, for my farmhouse table, if one of my 2x6 tabletop boards chips, I can remove the 8 pocket screws, get another board for $5, use the planer and sander to get it perfect, cut it to size, finish it, and fasten it instead of making a new tabletop. Bases are easy, but the tops take some precision and patience.

Yeah a table would require some screws.  That's a piece of furniture that's meant to be disassembled to some degree, so i don't blame you there.

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13 minutes ago, theJ said:

Plus no one is typically looking underneath a table top, so it's not like the screws are visible.  A smart design choice.

The table is also very heavy, and to move it requires it to be taken apart. Plus, bases are super easy, so I could probably sell it for $500-$1,000, and the lumber cost me $67 for all of it, and the total was about $100 after the stain and poly.

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  • 1 month later...

Light Bulb or Ballast issue?

I have an outdoor flood light with a mercury bulb on a photocell.  A few weeks ago it started acting up, turning itself on/off at night.  Mostly off.  Yesterday I replaced the photocell thinking it was malfunctioning.  Last night the problem remained.

So now i'm thinking it's either the bulb or the ballast.  Before I go back to the store to replace more stuff, i was hoping someone might be able to confirm for me.

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42 minutes ago, MWil23 said:

@theJ I've replaced a TON of ballasts over the years. If you can bypass that process, I'd highly recommend. LED is absolutely the way to go.

Yeah i ended up bypassing it.  It was much cheaper and easier.  I tried pulling the old one out for a few minutes before i thought of the bypass solution, and it would not come out.  I'm not sure it was glued or epoxied to the lighting housing or what.  But it was not budging.  

Took about 5 minutes to figure out the wiring and rewire it.  Easy peasy, $14.99 solution.

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8 minutes ago, theJ said:

Yeah i ended up bypassing it.  It was much cheaper and easier.  I tried pulling the old one out for a few minutes before i thought of the bypass solution, and it would not come out.  I'm not sure it was glued or epoxied to the lighting housing or what.  But it was not budging.  

Probably the old grease combined with the epoxy and year of dust/dirt. It's usually a very messy/dirty job.

8 minutes ago, theJ said:

Took about 5 minutes to figure out the wiring and rewire it.  Easy peasy, $14.99 solution.

Oh no doubt! LED is a complete gamechanger. It's also more efficient and last a lot longer too.

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Just now, MWil23 said:

Oh no doubt! LED is a complete gamechanger. It's also more efficient and last a lot longer too.

Supposedly 22 years.  Let's hope it lasts a good long while, bc it's 15 ft in the air and was a pain to get to.

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2 minutes ago, MWil23 said:

Probably the old grease combined with the epoxy and year of dust/dirt. It's usually a very messy/dirty job.

 

It was kind of weird because there was a bracket that looked like it held it in.  But after i removed the bracket, it still wouldn't come out.  🤷‍♂️

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Just now, theJ said:

Supposedly 22 years.  Let's hope it lasts a good long while, bc it's 15 ft in the air and was a pain to get to.

LOL, good to know, because I put in about 9 LED canned lights into my ceiling, which is vaulted, and I keep looking at them wondering "how long?" as the thought of a 20+ foot scaffolding to replace light bulbs grates on me. :)

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Just now, theJ said:
 

It was kind of weird because there was a bracket that looked like it held it in.  But after i removed the bracket, it still wouldn't come out.  🤷‍♂️

It's not abnormal unfortunately to have that much "stick" factor with the epoxy and dirt. It literally WILL NOT come out of T-Shirts either. That was my old job in the summers in college...replacing a ton of ballasts in classrooms in the old fluorescent light fixtures. 

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