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Shanedorf

2019 Green Bay Packers offseason - OTAs/minicamps

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Got news/ updates/commentary on the Mighty Green Bay Packers offseason ?

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From PackersWire

"A reporter even acknowledged that Josh Jackson appeared to “look bigger” than he was at the end of last year.
“Oh yeah. A lot bigger, for sure – 196 (pounds),” Jackson responded. “I’ve just tried to focus on my strength and conditioning and just working on self-improvement.”

Jackson started out OTAs as the Packers nickel cornerback, a spot he struggled at occasionally last year. With the Packers not having a dedicated slot corner, Jackson could be in line to see significant time there this season"

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From PackersNews: J'Mon Moore

“I feel like a fresh start to something that I’m familiar with,” Moore said. “But just a new beginning. I’ve got a year under my belt so I know what to expect with what the expectations are, but it’s a fresh start, clean slate. It’s a clean slate for everybody, which is the best feeling. Especially for me. It’s just another opportunity. A lot of people don’t get that.”

LaFleur said during the Packers’ rookie minicamp that young receivers need to learn the formations first, and then the route concepts within them — giving them the chance to be deployed anywhere along the line of scrimmage. It’s a system Moore feels he’s capable of pinning down.

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According to several media reports, the Packers opened organized team activities (OTAs) with newcomer Billy Turner at right guard, Bryan Bulaga at right tackle and Lane Taylor at left guard, with David Bakhtiari at left tackle and Corey Linsley at center.

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From PackersNews

The Packers are also changing how they train their secondary. After they went down to one position coach after having two last season, defensive backs coach Jason Simmons is leading safeties and cornerbacks. Simmons said safeties and cornerbacks almost always meet together in the same room, especially when discussing pass coverage. Safeties occasionally meet with linebackers separately from corners, Simmons said.

In the past, the Packers would sometimes hold joint meetings between safeties and corners, but they had separate meeting rooms for other meetings.

“The biggest thing,” Simmons said, “is it allows for greater continuity on the back end, for the corners and the safeties to be on the same page. That’s the biggest thing, because everybody knows where the strengths and the weaknesses with every coverage are.

“The biggest thing I talk about, particularly in this defense, that Mike Pettine wants us to do is have continuity on all three levels of the defense.”

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Anyone who wants to get pumped check out the Smith presser.

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1 hour ago, Shanedorf said:

LaFleur said during the Packers’ rookie minicamp that young receivers need to learn the formations first, and then the route concepts within them — giving them the chance to be deployed anywhere along the line of scrimmage. It’s a system Moore feels he’s capable of pinning down.

This explains why we didn't bother drafting a WR this year. Our room is full and it doesn't matter who is specifically placed in the slot because all of our receivers are supposed to be jack-of-all-trades.

 

...except Moore's a boundary receiver only...

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Joe said:

This explains why we didn't bother drafting a WR this year. Our room is full and it doesn't matter who is specifically placed in the slot because all of our receivers are supposed to be jack-of-all-trades.

 

...except Moore's a boundary receiver only...

this isn't what i took away from LaFleur's presser the other day.  he was asked about the difference between slot and boundary receivers / their skillsets.  his response was that he doesn't think about it in terms of where they line up, but rather in terms of what sort of route they're expected to run.  he said that you could have a guy line up in the slot, but run primarily vertical routes that have traditionally been run from the boundary.  you could have a smaller / quick guy line up on the boundary but run a choice route.  he also said one of his areas of focus is not allowing the defense to get a beat on what someone is going to do based on where they line up.

so, i do think it matters who you place in the slot depending on what your play is designed to do / who is supposed to be the primary read.  it isn't that all of our receivers are expected to be jacks of all trades because they could line up anywhere; its that they could line up anywhere based on how each play is designed to maximize their skillset.

Edited by snackattack

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Posted (edited)

...

Edited by vegas492
wrong thread

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The Packers need King healthy to start his third – and most important – season. “He’s a long, fast corner who can make plays on the football.
He’s definitely an important part for us moving forward,” coach Matt LaFleur said.

^^ ( understatement)

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2 hours ago, vegas492 said:

...

Agree completely.

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