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This Aint Packers Talk v69

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On 4/29/2019 at 11:17 AM, OneTwoSixFive said:

Mondegreen. Meaning a misheard lyric.

 

Heard the song tonight that makes think of this more than any other.

Blinded by the light by Manford Man aka the "song that says d@uche".

The guitar solo in that song is SO good, like maybe GOAT, and it'll always just be the song that says d@uche.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, wgbeethree said:

Heard the song tonight that makes think of this more than any other.

Blinded by the light by Manford Man aka the "song that says d@uche".

The guitar solo in that song is SO good, like maybe GOAT, and it'll always just be the song that says d@uche.

I never heard that song past the first 3 mins, the consequence of only ever hearing it on pop music stations or top of the Pops at that time (1976).

Nice to hear the rest of it, thanks for the mention. Here is the version I just fired up (over 7 mins long).   

https://youtu.be/xJh47LybCkU

 

Edited by OneTwoSixFive

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8 hours ago, wgbeethree said:

Heard the song tonight that makes think of this more than any other.

Blinded by the light by Manford Man aka the "song that says d@uche".

The guitar solo in that song is SO good, like maybe GOAT, and it'll always just be the song that says d@uche.

I resent the fact that I like this version of the song at all. At its conception, it was a gritty but playful piece of street poetry from the imaginarium of Bruce Springsteen's first album--"Greetings from Asbury Park, New Jersey". In the Springsteen version the idiosyncratic language is important to the painting of a kind of audio street art. I don't think Manfred Mann gives a passing thought to any of the words--it might as well be "wrapped up like a d**che" instead of "wrapped up like a deuce" for all Mann cares, but the instrumentation in his version is disgustingly catchy and fun.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, blueswedeshoes said:

I resent the fact that I like this version of the song at all. At its conception, it was a gritty but playful piece of street poetry from the imaginarium of Bruce Springsteen's first album--"Greetings from Asbury Park, New Jersey". In the Springsteen version the idiosyncratic language is important to the painting of a kind of audio street art. I don't think Manfred Mann gives a passing thought to any of the words--it might as well be "wrapped up like a d**che" instead of "wrapped up like a deuce" for all Mann cares, but the instrumentation in his version is disgustingly catchy and fun.

So long as you are not of the general opinion that 'first version is the only real version', that's ok (by me). You are specific in why you dislike of the copy, so I guess this doesn't apply to you. Each copied lyrics or copied tracks should be judged on their own merits, I guess.

Pointing back to my list of tracks on page 161, two of them stand out. Pete Tosh's version of  'Johhny B. Goode (originally Chuck Berry) and Sinead O'Connor's 'Sacrifice' (originally Elton John) were great examples of outstanding alternative versions. While i do like Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe singing 'When the Levee Breaks', Led Zeppelin took it to a level where it is probably my favourite track in all of their awesome discography. That track has what I like to call the drums from Hell and harping from Heaven*.   

* I read somewhere that for that album track, the drums were played at the bottom of an atrium, with the mikes were suspended way up high above him, to give that sound.

Edited by OneTwoSixFive

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I just want to go on record, as a crotchety old man that got dragged to a kindergarten graduation, that there may be an inverse relationship between the amount of balloons and flowers a six-year old gets on a day that marks nothing more than 180 days of enrollment, if not actual attendance, and the likelihood that the child actually graduates 12 years from now. This may be the family’s last shot to celebrate. 

Also, on a semi-related note, helium is the second most plentiful element on our planet, but the world supply is rapidly diminishing. Once released it cannot be recovered by any practical means. All the more reason for people to spend twenty bucks on latex, mylar, and a few cubic feet of a rapidly diminishing supply of a useful noble gas to give ostentatious notice of their regard for the minuscule achievements of a small child or the considerable and serious achievement of a near-adult—with balloons.

Holy #### where’s the Tylenol!

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To be clear, the pageantry of the Kindergarten graduation was splendid. Children are cool. In such a setting the well-behaved are precious and the ill-behaved are entertaining, and they also set a wonderfully low bar for comparing to the little ones that carry my DNA onward.

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4 hours ago, blueswedeshoes said:

To be clear, the pageantry of the Kindergarten graduation was splendid. Children are cool. In such a setting the well-behaved are precious and the ill-behaved are entertaining, and they also set a wonderfully low bar for comparing to the little ones that carry my DNA onward.

Citation needed

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I was recently asked why/how I don't like kids. My response was, "There's a 99% chance they grow up to be an a-hole I don't like. I'm just being preemptive."

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Gopher Trace said:

Very interesting article here about pass-rush versus pass-pro:

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/26888038/pass-blocking-matters-more-pass-rushing-prove-it

I've suspected this and stopped buying the "premium value" hype on GAME-CHANGING PASS-RUSHERS(TM) for a lil while now, 'just didn't have the empirical evidence to back it up.

Is it possible that pass blocking correlates with winning but doesn't cause winning?

It's possible, but we don't think that's the case. The fear is that is might be similar to the problem with rushing attempts. Rushing attempts correlate with winning, but not because running the ball more means teams will win more. Teams that win more are winning at the end of the game, and therefore are running out the clock.

Initially, we had some concern about that. Teams that are losing, for example, find themselves in must-pass situations. That might make it more difficult to pass block because opponents aren't kept honest by the threat of the run, and that could explain why worse teams have worse PBWRs. However, if that were true, we would also expect winning teams to have better PRWRs, and that isn't true to nearly the degree that it is with pass blocking.

+++

Not at all a big fan of using that logic to make your point. There are plenty of teams willing to sit back in coverage when they're winning and let teams burn clock throwing into the flats against a 3 man rush.

+++

Let's go back to pass blocking and pass rushing. So if we accept that pass blocking is more important than pass rushing, does that mean GMs should be paying the best offensive linemen more than the best defensive linemen?

In my opinion, on the offensive line, it's more critical to avoid a particularly poor weak blocker than to have a particularly strong best blocker. Think of pass protection like a chain. The weakest link will cause it to break the quickest, no matter how strong any one particular link might be. And the reverse is true for defense. It may take only one defender breaking through to wreak havoc on an opposing quarterback.

If we assume that concept to be true, it still remains possible that a single elite pass-rusher could be more valuable than a single elite pass-blocker. If I were a GM, I'd invest heavily in the offensive line as a group, but with that investment spread over many players rather than concentrated in a few. If we're working off the weak link theory, then depth is critical. Few teams will finish a season with the same offensive line it started with.

+++

This is the important piece here, and why you still pay the big money for the elite defensive lineman.

+++

Also, an R^2 value of .137 is not at all statistically significant enough to be posting this kind of conclusion.

Edited by AlexGreen#20

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Posted (edited)

 If by "defensive linemen" you mean DTs, then yeah,  I agree.  EDGE, considerably less so.  I would pay good money to keep a good one around, but not break the bank for any.

Edited by Gopher Trace

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KD. Achilles. Ouch.

Might never be the same. 30 years old and going to miss an entire season of basketball.

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On 6/4/2019 at 1:35 AM, wgbeethree said:

Heard the song tonight that makes think of this more than any other.

Blinded by the light by Manford Man aka the "song that says d@uche".

The guitar solo in that song is SO good, like maybe GOAT, and it'll always just be the song that says d@uche.

I mean, its good. But its a cover song. And not a Free Bird on guitar. 

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 greew

On 5/29/2019 at 5:43 AM, OneTwoSixFive said:

That is seriously fast.

The only thing missing there, is that in the pint drinking contests I saw (in England), when you finished the glass you had to turn it upside down on top of your head.

Did you ever play drinking games. I remember playing 'fizz buzz'. If memory serves, you have a circle of drinkers, someone starts the count (you start from one and count upwards). Every number divisible by 3 you have to say 'fizz' instead of the number. Every number divisible by 5 is 'buzz' instead of the number. So to start it would go: one, two, fizz, four, buzz, fizz, seven eight, fizz, buzz, eleven, fizz, thirteen, fourteen, fizz-buzz (divisible by both), etc. When someone gets it wrong the next player on the left gets to specify the drink (which might be a horrible combination....or not), next one around pays for the drink, and the one who got the count wrong has to drink it.......repeat from the start. I do remember that once everyone has had a good deal, a simple tomato juice could see them racing for the door, to to do a technicolour yawn, outside.

Beer Pong. For years and years we played it. Had all kinds of different local "house rules" depending on where we played. Lots of different variations too, civil war for example with 3 sets of cups.

Played lots of flip cup. Quarters. Some card drinking games. But mostly beer pong.

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