Jump to content

NFLPA President JC Tretter calls for permanent end of offseason programs


Recommended Posts

It's simply not true that there's been no difference in performance on the field either, just like in the 2011 after the lockout offenses were very productive, but lack of practice hurts defenses more than offenses. As the season has gone on defenses across the league have started to gel. Plus teams changing players/systems definitely were slower to get going - Tampa and NE are cases in point. That's not even going into the injury situation, which was horrendous the first month or so of the season.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, wwhickok said:

I think the way the season played out speaks for itself. I think the lack of conditioning and more injuries has been pretty evident, especially early on. But that's just an opinion. I haven't done the statistical analysis 

That's anecdotal evidence. We would need real data. Also, this year most players couldn't workout at all for some months due to the COVID lockdown. That alone led to more injuries and even if they rushed out and gained their size back too fast it's also harmful. And of course people also get injured during the off season programs, so how many saved themselves for several months because there wasn't any this year?

Plus most of the severe injuries we saw are ligament related and ain't no workout that prevents an acl rupture. It happens, most are non-contact injuries. If we go that way one could say that Bakhtiari would be able to play the post season if he had one less practice day this week.

Anyways As a fan I don't really care much but as someone said above: I'm not sure it's in the best interest of lower level / young players. And they are the majority in the NFLPA. Veterans lead the association but they should do whats best for the majority of their members.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ChazStandard said:

It's simply not true that there's been no difference in performance on the field either, just like in the 2011 after the lockout offenses were very productive, but lack of practice hurts defenses more than offenses. As the season has gone on defenses across the league have started to gel. Plus teams changing players/systems definitely were slower to get going - Tampa and NE are cases in point. That's not even going into the injury situation, which was horrendous the first month or so of the season.

ask and you shall receive. NFL Injuries Before and After the 2011 Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).  A statistical study published in 2018

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1805.01271.pdf

Quote

Among regular season game-loss, non-head, non-illness injuries, descriptive analyses and interrupted time series models did not indicate the CBAs practice restrictions had a net harmful effect on injury burden in the NFL. It does not appear that the practice restrictions pushed the NFL, on average, from a state of optimal training to one of under training, but whether there was previous over training or whether there is still undertraining remains unclear. However, other concurrent injury-related rule and regulation changes are potential confounding factors that limit specific causal inferences about the practice restrictions, and further studies are warranted

You can also look at this older article by Football Outsiders

https://www.footballoutsiders.com/stat-analysis/2015/nfl-injuries-part-ii-variation-over-time

There are several articles that look into the injury increase after lockouts.  The COVID problems might have hindered training for players similar to a lockout and added to the injuries we are seeing this season.

Edited by jebrick
Link to post
Share on other sites

I miss the days of 2 a day practices. Felt like the product was better overall with more time to focus on technique and development. 

Oline play has been rough in recent years for example. These guys are coming from spread college offenses and having to learn this all in a condensed way. 

Game is softer than it's ever been.

Link to post
Share on other sites

OTAs are voluntary so not sure what Tretter is expecting here.  You cant really ask teams to stop holding voluntary workouts in a negotiation.  It would be like negotiating that guys dont have to take a bus to practice when they are already allowed.to drive their own cars.  So what this really boils down to is 2 mandatory minicamps and rookie camps.  Rookie camps are mostly about getting the new guys in and acclimated to the building and systems they will be using.  Also to try out undrafted/unsigned guys.  I dont see that going anywhere.  So now we are down to 2 mandatory minicamps.  If push comes to shove over money the NFL will probably just let those go.  

And the NFL should 100% keep the expanded rosters and IR rules in place.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/31/2020 at 1:22 PM, Mega Ron said:

It is a physically demanding season. But they get a very, very long off season. 

lol seriously! nba ends in june and meets back up in september, not including summer league. don't know much about nhl or mlb.

what an absurd statement this fella is making

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t really care but the season seemed to go fine without them. 
 

I haven’t seen any numbers on injuries but I would think that would have more to do with preseason and limited contact training camp than OTAs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably more about negotiating.  If the salary cap is going down or staying flat....which might cause some significant cuts of higher payed vets, the impending negotiation to burrow cap from future years could be given in exchange for no OTAs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Troy Brown said:

lol seriously! nba ends in june and meets back up in september, not including summer league. don't know much about nhl or mlb.

what an absurd statement this fella is making

So the NBA has a shorter off season?

You appear to be making the same point Troy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, jebrick said:

ask and you shall receive. NFL Injuries Before and After the 2011 Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).  A statistical study published in 2018

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1805.01271.pdf

You can also look at this older article by Football Outsiders

https://www.footballoutsiders.com/stat-analysis/2015/nfl-injuries-part-ii-variation-over-time

There are several articles that look into the injury increase after lockouts.  The COVID problems might have hindered training for players similar to a lockout and added to the injuries we are seeing this season.

From the PDF:

Quote

5 Conclusions
Among regular season game-loss, non-head, non-illness injuries, descriptive analyses and interrupted time series models did not indicate the CBAs practice restrictions had a net harmful effect on injury burden in the NFL. It does not appear that the practice restrictions pushed the NFL, on average, from a state of optimal training to one of undertraining, but whether there was previous overtraining or whether there is still undertraining remains unclear. However, other concurrent injury-related rule and regulation changes are potential confounding factors that limit specific causal inferences about the practice restrictions, and further studies are warranted.

More importantly, I feel, was the results regarding hamstring injuries which are basically all about conditioning, diet and rest since we can assume all the NFL passed the genetic test (maybe outside some QBs). Here:

Quote

3.4 Sensitivity Analyses
We conducted several sensitivity analyses. Including minor injuries in did not substantially alter the models coefficients, nor did including preseason injuries or re-classifying knee and ankle injuries from unknown to non-conditioning. When examining hamstring injuries specifically, we observed an increase of these injuries over time pre-CBA followed by a reversing of that trend in the post-CBA era (Figure 3). The Poisson models also indicated stronger beneficial effects of the CBA. The models estimated a pre-CBA annual increase in hamstring injury rates of 12% (95% CI +2% to +23%) but a 4% annual decrease in the post-CBA era (95% CI -8% to +1%) (Table 3). The results were similar when considering the number of games missed due to injury (Table 3)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Troy Brown said:

lol seriously! nba ends in june and meets back up in september, not including summer league. don't know much about nhl or mlb.

what an absurd statement this fella is making

well NBA players can get away with that because their contracts are fully guaranteed. Bet you NFL players would be fine with what they are currently doing if they knew they wouldnt be in trouble contract wise if they got hurt in an offseason program. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...