Jump to content

Home Improvement/Remodel Thread


Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, MWil23 said:

Something like this?

403def19daf74811b4a4038f7e26a7c1.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

IMO, get about 2 8 foot 4x4's and make 4 legs at 36 inches each. If you use whitewood/cedar/fir for that, I'd use yellow pine 2x10 or 2x12 for the cross section and top, with 2x4 for the brace between and platforms (there are 2) in a deck fashion, but I'd use a Kreg Jig for pocket holes underneath.

Also, here's a starting point, and then you can use WHATEVER dimensions that you want :) 

https://jayscustomcreations.com/2014/12/make-a-wooden-cooler-box/

 

Yeah this is exactly what I'm thinking except an elongated side where the cooler is offset to play around w/ whether it be an open tub or have a cover to keep it leveled off.

Did you make these? They look good!

EDIT: Just looked at that site as I missed it and that's detailed and I hadn't come across this one yet. Doesn't look like it'll be that difficult.

Edited by BobbyPhil1781
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, theJ said:

I think you can do it.  A long straight edge clamped to the workpiece will do most of the work for you.  Just let that circular saw ride along it.

Thanks for the advice. I agree that should be enough if I opt to go that route.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Finished fencing in the back yard today, and was immediately propositioned by a neighbor to help her build a fence. Pretty happy with everything except the gate.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/15/2021 at 3:06 AM, Daniel said:

Finished fencing in the back yard today, and was immediately propositioned by a neighbor to help her build a fence. Pretty happy with everything except the gate.

Nothing worse than doing improvements to the garden to see a neighbour say those dreaded words....”can you just take a look”

Always ends up in you doing a job.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2021 at 11:06 PM, Daniel said:

Finished fencing in the back yard today, and was immediately propositioned by a neighbor to help her build a fence. Pretty happy with everything except the gate.

Did you use an 8x8 for the posts? Those gates are super heavy. @NateDawg and I just got done with his a few months ago.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MWil23 said:

Did you use an 8x8 for the posts? Those gates are super heavy. @NateDawg and I just got done with his a few months ago.

Nah.  Used lawn timbers, since they're $5 a piece instead of $25 like the 4x4s, and since I know they won't rot in damp soil.  Built the gate myself out of pieces of decking, so it's sturdy and heavy, but not too heavy for those posts.  Also made sure to bury them all at least 18 inches and fill the holes with drainage pebbles and sakrete.

Then I have three pieces of decking across the posts, screwed in.  Still need to cut off the remainder of the posts so I can put another piece across the top and give it just a little more structure and a nice flat top.  The fence is just to keep our dogs in and the other critters out, and it connects to our neighbors' privacy fence, so it's just a slim section.

The wood part connects to the driveway, where we put black aluminum panels down to the house.  We're gonna fence in the entire yard down the road, but for now, it gives us a place to let the dogs out in.

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Daniel said:

Nah.  Used lawn timbers, since they're $5 a piece instead of $25 like the 4x4s, and since I know they won't rot in damp soil.  Built the gate myself out of pieces of decking, so it's sturdy and heavy, but not too heavy for those posts.  Also made sure to bury them all at least 18 inches and fill the holes with drainage pebbles and sakrete.

Got it. The only difference between yours then is the 8x8, as the rest of the gate was made from decking.

25 minutes ago, Daniel said:

Then I have three pieces of decking across the posts, screwed in.  Still need to cut off the remainder of the posts so I can put another piece across the top and give it just a little more structure and a nice flat top.  The fence is just to keep our dogs in and the other critters out, and it connects to our neighbors' privacy fence, so it's just a slim section.

The wood part connects to the driveway, where we put black aluminum panels down to the house.  We're gonna fence in the entire yard down the road, but for now, it gives us a place to let the dogs out in.

Makes sense. His covers the entire backyard (he's got a total of 2 acres), so it was quite the undertaking, but it looks fantastic and his dog loves it. The gate was so that he can get a truck/equipment back there if needed, hence the double swing gate.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, MWil23 said:

Makes sense. His covers the entire backyard (he's got a total of 2 acres), so it was quite the undertaking, but it looks fantastic and his dog loves it. The gate was so that he can get a truck/equipment back there if needed, hence the double swing gate.

Yeah, I have a two-thirds acre yard myself, and built a double swinging gate for the same reason.  We may pour some more concrete in the back at a later date, so we needed at least 12' of clearance.  We've got a brick and a cinder block holding them up in the middle right now, but we're gonna add something for it to sit on later, so it doesn't sag and pull on the two posts too much.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Daniel said:

Yeah, I have a two-thirds acre yard myself, and built a double swinging gate for the same reason.  We may pour some more concrete in the back at a later date, so we needed at least 12' of clearance.  We've got a brick and a cinder block holding them up in the middle right now, but we're gonna add something for it to sit on later, so it doesn't sag and pull on the two posts too much.

He used concrete to anchor those babies in, and there isn't a middle support, so that is probably why there's a difference there. :) 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2021 at 8:06 PM, Daniel said:

Finished fencing in the back yard today, and was immediately propositioned by a neighbor to help her build a fence. Pretty happy with everything except the gate.

This is why I never learned how to do anything remotely "handy"

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2021 at 12:45 PM, Daniel said:

Yeah, I have a two-thirds acre yard myself, and built a double swinging gate for the same reason.  We may pour some more concrete in the back at a later date, so we needed at least 12' of clearance.  We've got a brick and a cinder block holding them up in the middle right now, but we're gonna add something for it to sit on later, so it doesn't sag and pull on the two posts too much.

As @MWil23said I recently finished an acre of farm fencing and a double swing gate. The gate took a lot of time because I tried to be a perfectionist, and the 8x8 supports were probably overkill, but I also liked the character of having a gate with high character supports. The 4x4s were all spaced 6 feet apart so I used 12 foot deck boards. It was tricky to level everything when I didn’t have other hands but I found a system that worked. I buried the 4x4s typically about 3 feet deep and poured concrete. Honestly, the biggest blessing is with a year and a half old chocolate lab and three small children in the house, having a remodel, etc, he has a lot of energy and we need to send him outside quite often. Every time we used to put him out, we would have to go out with him so that he wouldn’t run away. Now we can set him out back and not worry about it. Which is awesome in the winter time especially.

 I can relate to your task, it’s a satisfying job when completed. Unfortunately I will still have to do the finishing work on it this summer, which will be pretty time-consuming.

We bought our house last summer, which was largely a fixer-upper, in the country. There has been a nonstop honey-do list. We are nearing completion on a remodel. I am also finishing up a ten-foot farm table. I must say, I enjoy fixing things up and completing some of these things but I am also looking forward to having an empty slate on some of these jobs.

Edited by NateDawg
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice. That much fencing is a project for sure. I grew up on a farm, so I’ve assisted in much fence building, but it was always cedar posts and wire or metal posts and electric fencing, so this is the first wooden fence I’ve done.

My neighbor asking for help was a very proud moment.

And I’m in the exact same situation. Fixer upper house with constant to do stuff. Garden is next, but after that I too am making a large table, but mine will be a modest 8 feet, made from an old door.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone have any insight on metal roofing for a house? I've lived in my house for a couple years and the costs are starting to pile up on me. My roof is not looking so hot. I've got at least one cracked rafter and some leaks. I'm looking for the most cost effective way of fixing it up and I thought slapping a metal roof over it might be that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MOSteelers56 said:

Anyone have any insight on metal roofing for a house? I've lived in my house for a couple years and the costs are starting to pile up on me. My roof is not looking so hot. I've got at least one cracked rafter and some leaks. I'm looking for the most cost effective way of fixing it up and I thought slapping a metal roof over it might be that. 

as a lifelong roofer, i can advise you against "slapping" any roofing on, as it's one of the most critical elements of the house frame.

whatever roofing material you choose, you should remove the existing roof layer(s) down to the original wood sheathing. repair any damages you see at that time, put on the final roofing, and you'll be good for 2-5 decades.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, MOSteelers56 said:

Anyone have any insight on metal roofing for a house? I've lived in my house for a couple years and the costs are starting to pile up on me. My roof is not looking so hot. I've got at least one cracked rafter and some leaks. I'm looking for the most cost effective way of fixing it up and I thought slapping a metal roof over it might be that. 

Metal roofing, last I checked, can be more cost effective than asphalt shingles. Particularly if you have a simple roof. If you have a lot of peaks, it may not be. Best to get a few quotes, and ask about warranties. 

Generally speaking, metal roofs do typically hold a longer warranty. 

However, they do stand out more than an asphalt shingle roof. So in terms of resale, it may detract from the property some. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...